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Political Science (17) - Archived

Mostrando recursos 1 - 20 de 64

  1. 17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, Future, Fall 2010

    Van Evera, Stephen
    This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad?

  2. 17.950 Understanding Military Operations, Spring 2010

    Cote, Owen
    A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, and the human or organizational side of war. This seminar will break apart selected past, current, and future sea, air, space, and land battlefields into their constituent parts and look at the interaction in each of those warfare areas between existing military doctrine and weapons, sensors, communications, and information processing technologies. It will specifically seek to explore how technological development, whether innovative or stagnant, is influenced in each warfare area by military doctrine.

  3. 17.486 Japan and East Asian Security, Spring 2008

    Samuels, Richard J.
    This subject is designed for graduate students interested in international politics, national security and comparative political economy in East Asia. It examines the political, military, and economic challenges facing Japan, its neighbors, and the international system under conditions of great uncertainty. Topics range from the history of once "new" world orders to theories that inform our understanding of international affairs and foreign policy decision-making, as each is related to Japan. We focus on Japanese bilateral, regional, and global security policies from a range of theoretical perspectives. The semester will culminate in a weekend-long Asia-Pacific Crisis Simulation game in which invited...

  4. 17.181 / 17.182 Sustainable Development: Theory and Policy, Spring 2009

    Choucri, Nazli
    This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance.

  5. 17.181 / 17.182 Sustainable Development: Theory and Policy, Spring 2009

    Choucri, Nazli
    This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance.

  6. 17.251 Congress and the American Political System I, Fall 2004

    Stewart III, Charles
    This course focuses on both the internal processes of the House and Senate and on the place of Congress in the American political system. Attention has been given to committee behavior, leadership patterns, and informal organization in this course. It considers relations between Congress and other branches of government, as well as relations between the two houses of Congress itself. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

  7. 17.57J / 21H.467J Soviet Politics and Society, 1917-1991, Spring 2003

    Woodruff, David; Wood, Elizabeth A.
    At its greatest extent the former Soviet Union encompassed a geographical area that covered one-sixth of the Earth's landmass. It spanned 11 time zones and contained over 100 distinct nationalities, 22 of which numbered over one million in population. In the 74 years from the October Revolution in 1917 to the fall of Communism in 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, its leaders and its people, had to face a number of difficult challenges: the overthrow of the Tsarist autocracy, the establishment of a new state, four years of civil war, a famine, transition to a mixed economy, political...

  8. 17.100J / 15.678J / 14.781J Political Economy I, Fall 2010

    Berger, Suzanne; Piore, Michael
    Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based.

  9. 11.164 / 11.497 / 17.391 Human Rights in Theory and Practice, Fall 2010

    Rajagopal, Balakrishnan
    This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning of the international human rights mechanisms including non-governmental and inter-governmental ones. It covers cutting-edge human rights issues including gender and race discrimination, religion and state, national security and terrorism, globalization and human rights, and technology and human rights.

  10. 11.002J / 17.30J Fundamentals of Public Policy, Fall 2004

    Meyer, Steve; Laws, David
    Fundamentals of Public Policy is an introductory course that explores policy-making as both a problem-solving process and a political process. We look at policy-making from the perspective of different focal actors and institutions, including: administrative agencies, legislators, the courts, the mass public, interest groups, and the media. We examine the interplay between policy development and institutions, and review normative and empirical models of policy-making. Exploring these issues will require us to address questions like: How and why does something come to be seen as a "public problem" requiring a governmental response, while others fail to get attention? Why do we...

  11. SP.601J / 17.006 / 24.237 / WGS.601J Feminist Political Thought, Spring 2010

    Wood, Elizabeth A.
    In this course we will examine the development of feminist theory over time. Some subjects we will examine in detail include suffrage and equality; radical feminism; psychoanalysis and feminism; theories of power; sexuality and gender; embodied knowledge; pornography; identities and global feminism; militarism; and the welfare state. Throughout the course we will analyze different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality.

  12. 17.908 Reading Seminar in Social Science: Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law, Spring 2007

    Ghachem, Malick
    This course surveys the relationship between race and crime in the United States, with a special emphasis on the role this relationship has played in the development of American ideas about citizenship and nationhood.

  13. 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics, Fall 2006

    Lawson, Chappell
    This class first offers some basic analytical frameworks - culture, social structure, and institutions - that you can use to examine a wide range of political outcomes. We then use these frameworks to understand (1) the relationship between democracy and economic development and (2) the relative centralization of political authority across countries. We will use theoretical arguments and a wide range of case studies to address several questions: Why are some countries democratic and others not? How does democracy affect economic development and political conflict? Why do some countries centralize power while others threaten to fall apart through secession and...

  14. 17.20 Introduction to the American Political Process, Fall 2006

    Lenz, Gabriel
    This course provides students with an introduction to the basic institutions of American government, especially as established in the constitution, and with an introduction to currents of thought among social scientists about the workings of U.S. politics. This is a communication intensive course. As such you are required to write at least 20 pages - that's the C.I. requirement - and participate in class discussions.

  15. 17.952 Great Power Military Intervention, Spring 2004

    Posen, Barry
    The purpose of this seminar is to examine systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions into civil wars during the 1990's. These civil wars were high on the policy agenda of western states during the 1990's. Yet, these interventions were usually not motivated by obvious classical vital interests. Given the extraordinary security enjoyed by the great and middle powers of the west in the Cold War's aftermath, these activities are puzzling.

  16. 17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights, Fall 2006

    Ghachem, Malick
    This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure.

  17. 17.871 Political Science Laboratory, Spring 2004

    Stewart III, Charles
    This course introduces students to the conduct of political research using quantitative methodologies. The methods are examined in the context of specific political research activities like public opinion surveys, voting behavior, Congressional behavior, comparisons of political processes in different countries, and the evaluation of public policies. Students participate in joint class projects and conduct individual projects.

  18. SP.601J / 17.006J / 17.007J / 24.237J Feminist Theory, Spring 2008

    Wood, Elizabeth A.
    This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years, feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course, we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of feminist theory. In addition, we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race...

  19. 17.118J / SP.412J / WGS.412J Feminist Political Thought, Fall 2000

    Wood, Elizabeth A.
    This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of political theory. In addition we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race...

  20. 17.01J / 24.04J Justice, Spring 2006

    Cohen, Joshua
    This course explores three fundamental questions about the ideal of a just society and the place of values of liberty and equality in such a society. Answers to the questions provided by three contemporary theories of justice: Utilitarianism, Libertarianism, and Egalitarian Liberalism will be examined. To assess the strengths and weaknesses of these theories, a discussion of their implications for some topics of ongoing moral-political controversy will also be covered.

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