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DSpace at MIT (104.280 recursos)

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Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (12) -

Mostrando recursos 1 - 20 de 71

  1. 12.009 Theoretical Environmental Analysis, Spring 2011

    Rothman, Daniel; Follett, Christopher
    This course analyzes cooperative processes that shape the natural environment, now and in the geologic past. It emphasizes the development of theoretical models that relate the physical and biological worlds, the comparison of theory to observational data, and associated mathematical methods. Topics include carbon cycle dynamics; ecosystem structure, stability and complexity; mass extinctions; biosphere-geosphere coevolution; and climate change. Employs techniques such as stability analysis; scaling; null model construction; time series and network analysis.

  2. 12.086 / 12.586 Modeling Environmental Complexity, Fall 2011

    Rothman, Daniel
    This course provides an introduction to the study of environmental phenomena that exhibit both organized structure and wide variability — i.e., complexity. Through focused study of a variety of physical, biological, and chemical problems in conjunction with theoretical models, we learn a series of lessons with wide applicability to understanding the structure and organization of the natural world. Students will also learn how to construct minimal mathematical, physical, and computational models that provide informative answers to precise questions.

  3. 12.001 Introduction to Geology, Spring 2011

    Perron, Taylor; Jagoutz, Oliver
    This course introduces students to the basics of geology. Through a combination of lectures, labs, and field observations, we will address topics ranging from formation of the elements, mineral and rock identification, and geological mapping to plate tectonics, erosion and climate engineering.

  4. 12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry, Spring 2009

    Frey, Frederick
    The emphasis of this course is to use Trace Element Geochemistry to understand the origin and evolution of igneous rocks. The approach is to discuss the parameters that control partitioning of trace elements between phases and to develop models for the partitioning of trace elements between phases in igneous systems, especially between minerals and melt. Subsequently, published papers that are examples of utilizing Trace Element Geochemistry are read and discussed.

  5. 12.007 Geobiology, Spring 2009

    Summons, Roger; Bosak, Tanja
    This course introduces parallel evolution of life and the environment. Life processes are influenced by chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. In turn, life can influence chemical and physical processes on our planet. This course introduces the concept of life as a geological agent and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly four billion years since life first appeared.

  6. 12.006J / 18.353J / 2.050J Nonlinear Dynamics I: Chaos, Fall 2006

    Rothman, Daniel
    This course provides an introduction to the theory and phenomenology of nonlinear dynamics and chaos in dissipative systems. The content is structured to be of general interest to undergraduates in science and engineering.

  7. 12.141 Electron Microprobe Analysis by Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry, January IAP 2010

    Chatterjee, Nilanjan
    This lab-oriented course introduces the student to the subject of X-ray spectrometry and micro-scale chemical quantitative analysis of solid samples through an intensive series of hands-on laboratory exercises that use the electron microprobe.

  8. 12.540 Principles of Global Positioning Systems, Spring 2008

    Herring, Thomas
    The aim of this course is to introduce the principles of the Global Positioning System and to demonstrate its application to various aspects of Earth Sciences. The specific content of the course depends each year on the interests of the students in the class. In some cases, the class interests are towards the geophysical applications of GPS and we concentrate on high precision (millimeter level) positioning on regional and global scales. In other cases, the interests have been more toward engineering applications of kinematic positioning with GPS in which case the concentration is on positioning with slightly less accuracy but...

  9. 18.152 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations, Fall 2004

    Staffilani, Gigliola; Vasy, Andras
    This course analyzes initial and boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations and the wave and heat equation in one space dimension. It also covers the Sturm-Liouville theory and eigenfunction expansions, as well as the Dirichlet problem for Laplace's operator and potential theory.

  10. 11.124 Introduction to Teaching and Learning Mathematics and Science, Fall 2004

    Klopfer, Eric
    This course provides an introduction to teaching and learning in a variety of K-12 settings. Through visits to schools, classroom discussions, selected readings, and hands-on activities, we explore the challenges and opportunities of teaching. Topics of study include educational technology, design and experimentation, student learning, and careers in education.

  11. 6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation, Fall 2004

    Miller, Robert
    6.831 introduces the principles of user interface development, focusing on three key areas: Design: How to design good user interfaces, starting with human capabilities (including the human information processor model, perception, motor skills, color, attention, and errors) and using those capabilities to drive design techniques: task analysis, user-centered design, iterative design, usability guidelines, interaction styles, and graphic design principles. Implementation: Techniques for building user interfaces, including low-fidelity prototypes, Wizard of Oz, and other prototyping tools; input models, output models, model-view-controller, layout, constraints, and toolkits. Evaluation: Techniques for evaluating and measuring interface usability, including heuristic evaluation, predictive evaluation, and user testing....

  12. 11.131 Educational Theory and Practice III, Spring 2007

    Klopfer, Eric; Gibb, Reen
    This is the final course in the three course sequence (11.129, 11.130 and 11.131) that deals with the practicalities of teaching students. Our areas of study will include: educational psychology, identification of useful resources that support instruction, learning to use technology in meaningful ways in the classroom, finding more methods of motivating students, implementing differentiated instruction and obtaining a teaching job.

  13. 21M.220 Early Music, Spring 2007

    Cuthbert, Michael Scott
    This class covers the history of Western music from antiquity until approximately 1680, about 2000 years worth of music. Rather than cover each topic at the same level of depth, we will focus on four topics in particular and glue them together with a broad overview of other topics. The four topics chosen for this term are (1) chant structure, performance, and development; (2) 14th century music of Italy and France; (3) Elizabethan London; and (4) Venice in the Baroque era. The class will also introduce many of the tools we use in studying music history such as manuscript study,...

  14. 11.165 / 11.477 Infrastructure in Crisis: Energy and Security Challenges, Fall 2009

    Polenske, Karen R.; Ratanawaraha, Apiwat
    The purpose of this seminar is to examine efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions to create, finance and regulate infrastructure systems and services that affect energy security. We will introduce a variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives. During the seminar, students will explore how an energy crisis can be an opportunity for making fundamental changes to improve collapsing infrastructure networks. The sessions will be used to introduce the challenges to modern society concerning energy security, and for students to study how food security and energy security are intertwined, as well as how infrastructure supports the energy system. We...

  15. 12.086 / 12.586 Modeling Environmental Complexity, Fall 2008

    Rothman, Daniel
    This course provides an introduction to the study of environmental phenomena that exhibit both organized structure and wide variability—i.e., complexity. Through focused study of a variety of physical, biological, and chemical problems in conjunction with theoretical models, we learn a series of lessons with wide applicability to understanding the structure and organization of the natural world. Students will also learn how to construct minimal mathematical, physical, and computational models that provide informative answers to precise questions.

  16. 24.09 Minds and Machines, Spring 2007

    Byrne, Alex
    This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. Some of the questions we will discuss include the following. Can computers think? Is the mind an immaterial thing? Or is the mind the brain? Or does the mind stand to the brain as a computer program stands to the hardware? How can creatures like ourselves think thoughts that are "about" things? (For example, we can all think that Aristotle is a philosopher, and in that sense think "about" Aristotle, but what is the explanation of this quite remarkable ability?)...

  17. 5.301 Chemistry Laboratory Techniques, January IAP 2004

    Tabacco, Sarah
    This course is an intensive introduction to the techniques of experimental chemistry and gives first year students an opportunity to learn and master the basic chemistry lab techniques for carrying out experiments. Students who successfully complete the course and obtain a "Competent Chemist" (CC) or "Expert Experimentalist" (EE) rating are likely to secure opportunities for research work in a chemistry lab at MIT. Acknowledgements The laboratory manual and materials for this course were prepared by Dr. Katherine J. Franz and Dr. Kevin M. Shea with the assistance of Professors Rick L. Danheiser and Timothy M. Swager. Materials have been revised...

  18. 12.010 Computational Methods of Scientific Programming, Fall 2008

    Herring, Thomas; Hill, Chris
    This course introduces programming languages and techniques used by physical scientists: FORTRAN, C, C++, MATLAB, and Mathematica. Emphasis is placed on program design, algorithm development and verification, and comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages.

  19. 21H.909 People and Other Animals, Fall 2005

    Ritvo, Harriet
    A historical survey of the ways that people have interacted with their closest animal relatives, for example: hunting, domestication of livestock, worship of animal gods, exploitation of animal labor, scientific study of animals, display of exotic and performing animals, and pet keeping. Themes include changing ideas about animal agency and intelligence, our moral obligations to animals, and the limits imposed on the use of animals.

  20. 21M.785 / 21M.789 / 21W.769J Playwrights' Workshop, Spring 2007

    Brody, Alan
    This course provides continued work in the development of play scripts for the theater. Writers work on sustained pieces in weekly workshop meetings, individual consultation with the instructor, and in collaboration with student actors, directors, and designers. Fully developed scripts are eligible for inclusion in the Playwrights' Workshop Production.

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