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Mechanical Engineering (2) - Archived

Mostrando recursos 1 - 20 de 86

  1. 2.062J / 1.138J / 18.376J Wave Propagation, Fall 2006

    Mei, Chiang; Rosales, Rodolfo; Akylas, Triantaphyllos
    This course discusses the Linearized theory of wave phenomena in applied mechanics. Examples are chosen from elasticity, acoustics, geophysics, hydrodynamics and other subjects. The topics include: basic concepts, one dimensional examples, characteristics, dispersion and group velocity, scattering, transmission and reflection, two dimensional reflection and refraction across an interface, mode conversion in elastic waves, diffraction and parabolic approximation, radiation from a line source, surface Rayleigh waves and Love waves in elastic media, waves on the sea surface and internal waves in a stratified fluid, waves in moving media, ship wave pattern, atmospheric lee waves behind an obstacle, and waves through a...

  2. 2.062J / 1.138J / 18.376J Wave Propagation, Fall 2006

    Mei, Chiang; Rosales, Rodolfo; Akylas, Triantaphyllos
    This course discusses the Linearized theory of wave phenomena in applied mechanics. Examples are chosen from elasticity, acoustics, geophysics, hydrodynamics and other subjects. The topics include: basic concepts, one dimensional examples, characteristics, dispersion and group velocity, scattering, transmission and reflection, two dimensional reflection and refraction across an interface, mode conversion in elastic waves, diffraction and parabolic approximation, radiation from a line source, surface Rayleigh waves and Love waves in elastic media, waves on the sea surface and internal waves in a stratified fluid, waves in moving media, ship wave pattern, atmospheric lee waves behind an obstacle, and waves through a...

  3. 2.854 / 2.853 Introduction to Manufacturing Systems, Fall 2010

    Gershwin, Stanley; Boning, Duane
    This course provides students with ways of analyzing manufacturing systems in terms of material flow and storage, information flow, capacities, and times and durations of events. Fundamental topics covered include probability, inventory and queuing models, forecasting, optimization, process analysis, and linear and dynamic systems. This course also covers factory planning and scheduling topics including flow planning, bottleneck characterization, buffer and batch-size tactics, seasonal planning, and dynamic behavior of production systems.

  4. 5.95J / 6.982J / 7.59J / 8.395J / 18.094J / 1.95J / 2.978J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2012

    Rankin, Janet
    This participatory seminar focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary for teaching science and engineering in higher education. This course is designed for graduate students interested in an academic career, and anyone else interested in teaching. Topics include theories of adult learning; course development; promoting active learning, problem-solving, and critical thinking in students; communicating with a diverse student body; using educational technology to further learning; lecturing; creating effective tests and assignments; and assessment and evaluation. Students research and present a relevant topic of particular interest. The subject is appropriate for both novices and those with teaching experience.

  5. 20.430J / 2.795J / 6.561J / 10.539J / HST.544J Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems (BE.430J), Fall 2004

    Lauffenburger, Douglas; Grodzinsky, Alan
    This course covers the following topics: conduction, diffusion, convection in electrolytes; fields in heterogeneous media; electrical double layers; Maxwell stress tensor and electrical forces in physiological systems; and fluid and solid continua: equations of motion useful for porous, hydrated biological tissues. Case studies considered include membrane transport; electrode interfaces; electrical, mechanical, and chemical transduction in tissues; electrophoretic and electroosmotic flows; diffusion/reaction; and ECG. The course also examines electromechanical and physicochemical interactions in biomaterials and cells; orthopaedic, cardiovascular, and other clinical examples.

  6. 2.797J / 3.053J / 6.024J / 20.310J Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Biomechanics, Fall 2006

    Lang, Matthew; Kamm, Roger D.
    This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic properties; chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior; cell mechanics, motility and adhesion; biomembranes; biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors. The class also examines experimental methods for probing structures at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels.

  7. 2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics, Fall 2011

    Lermusiaux, Pierre
    This course will provide students with an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB®. Topics covered throughout the course will include: errors, condition numbers and roots of equations; Navier-Stokes; direct and iterative methods for linear systems; finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations; Fourier decomposition, error analysis, and stability; high-order and compact finite-differences; finite volume methods; time marching methods; Navier-Stokes solvers; grid generation; finite volumes on complex geometries; finite element methods; spectral methods; boundary element and panel methods; turbulent flows; boundary layers; Lagrangian Coherent Structures. Subject includes a final research project.

  8. 2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics, Fall 2005

    McKinley, Gareth; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.; Sonin, Ain; Hosoi, Anette
    This course surveys the principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Topics include mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua, the Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows, similarity and dimensional analysis, lubrication theory, boundary layers and separation, circulation and vorticity theorems, potential flow, an introduction to turbulence, lift and drag, surface tension and surface tension driven flows. The class assumes students have had one prior undergraduate class in the area of fluid mechanics. Emphasis is placed on being able to formulate and solve typical problems of engineering importance.

  9. 2.701 Introduction to Naval Architecture (13.400), Fall 2004

    Herbein, David; McCoy, Timothy
    This course is an introduction to principles of naval architecture, ship geometry, hydrostatics, calculation and drawing of curves of form. It also explores concepts of  intact and damaged stability, hull structure strength calculations and ship resistance. Projects include analysis of ship lines drawings and ship model testing. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.400. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mechanical Engineering), and this course was renumbered 2.701.

  10. 2.14 / 2.140 Analysis and Design of Feedback Control Systems, Spring 2007

    Trumper, David
    This course develops the fundamentals of feedback control using linear transfer function system models. It covers analysis in time and frequency domains; design in the s-plane (root locus) and in the frequency domain (loop shaping); describing functions for stability of certain non-linear systems; extension to state variable systems and multivariable control with observers; discrete and digital hybrid systems and the use of z-plane design. Assignments include extended design case studies and capstone group projects. Graduate students are expected to complete additional assignments.

  11. 2.737 Mechatronics, Spring 1999

    Trumper, David
    This course teaches the design of mechatronic systems which integrate mechanical, electrical, and control systems engineering. A computer hard disk drive is an example of a complex mechatronic system discussed in the class. Laboratories form the core of the course. They cover topics such as aliasing, quantization, electronic feedback, power amplifiers, digital logic, encoder interfacing, and motor control. The labs make extensive use of Simulink®, a MATLAB® toolbox which allows for graphical simulation and programming of real-time control systems. The new lab facilities feature dSPACE digital signal processors which are programmed through Simulink®. Each student builds circuits on a breadboard kit which is...

  12. HST.523J / 2.785J / 3.97J / 20.411J Cell-Matrix Mechanics, Spring 2004

    Yannas, Ioannis; Spector, Myron
    Mechanical forces play a decisive role during development of tissues and organs, during remodeling following injury as well as in normal function. A stress field influences cell function primarily through deformation of the extracellular matrix to which cells are attached. Deformed cells express different biosynthetic activity relative to undeformed cells. The unit cell process paradigm combined with topics in connective tissue mechanics form the basis for discussions of several topics from cell biology, physiology, and medicine.

  13. 2.080J / 1.573J Structural Mechanics (13.10J), Fall 2002

    Connor, Jerome; Patrikalakis, Nicholas
    Fundamental concepts of structural mechanics with applications to marine, civil, and mechanical structures. Residual stresses. Thermal effects. Analysis of beams, columns, tensioned beams, trusses, frames, cables, and shafts of general shape and material, including composites. Elastic buckling of columns. Exact and approximate methods, energy methods, principle of virtual work, introduction to computational structural mechanics. Examples from civil, mechanical, offshore, and ship structures. This course was originally offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.10J. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mechanical Engineering), and this course was renumbered 2.080J.

  14. 2.627 / 2.626 Fundamentals of Photovoltaics, Fall 2011

    Buonassisi, Tonio
    In this course, students learn about the fundamentals of photoelectric conversion: charge excitation, conduction, separation, and collection. Lectures cover commercial and emerging photovoltaic technologies and cross-cutting themes, including conversion efficiencies, loss mechanisms, characterization, manufacturing, systems, reliability, life-cycle analysis, and risk analysis. Some of the course will also be devoted to discussing photovoltaic technology evolution in the context of markets, policies, society, and environment.

  15. 2.626 Fundamentals of Photovoltaics, Fall 2008

    Buonassisi, Tonio
    In this course students will learn how solar cells convert light into electricity, how solar cells are manufactured, how solar cells are evaluated, what technologies are currently on the market, and how to evaluate the risk and potential of existing and emerging solar cell technologies. We examine the potential & drawbacks of currently manufactured technologies (single- and multi-crystalline silicon, micromorph tandem cells, CdTe, CIGS, CPV, PVT), as well as pre-commercial technologies (organics, biomimetic, organic/inorganic hybrid, and nanostructure-based solar cells). Hands-on laboratory sessions explore how a solar cell works in practice. We scrutinize what limits solar cell performance and cost, and...

  16. 15.067 Competitive Decision-Making and Negotiation, Spring 2003

    Kaufman, Gordon
    This course is centered on twelve negotiation exercises that simulate competitive business situations. Specific topics covered include distributive bargaining (split the pie!), mixed motive bargaining (several issues at stake) with two and with more than two parties, auctions and fair division. Ethical dilemmas in negotiation are discussed at various times throughout the course. There are two principal objectives for this course. The first is to provide you with negotiation tools that enable you to achieve your negotiation objectives in a fair and responsible fashion. The second is to "learn by doing." That is, we provide a forum in which you...

  17. 12.006J / 18.353J / 2.050J Nonlinear Dynamics I: Chaos, Fall 2006

    Rothman, Daniel
    This course provides an introduction to the theory and phenomenology of nonlinear dynamics and chaos in dissipative systems. The content is structured to be of general interest to undergraduates in science and engineering.

  18. 2.086 Numerical Computation for Mechanical Engineers, Spring 2012

    Patera, Anthony; Penn, James Douglass; Yano, Masayuki
    This class introduces elementary programming concepts including variable types, data structures, and flow control. After an introduction to linear algebra and probability, it covers numerical methods relevant to mechanical engineering, including approximation (interpolation, least squares and statistical regression), integration, solution of linear and nonlinear equations, ordinary differential equations, and deterministic and probabilistic approaches. Examples are drawn from mechanical engineering disciplines, in particular from robotics, dynamics, and structural analysis. Assignments require MATLAB® programming.

  19. 10.391J / 1.818J / 2.65J / 11.371J / 22.811J / ESD.166J Sustainable Energy, January IAP 2007 - Spring 2007

    Drake, Elisabeth; Incropera, Frank; Tester, Jefferson W.; Golay, Michael
    This course assesses current and potential future energy systems, covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, and emphasizes meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented including biomass energy, fossil fuels, geothermal energy, nuclear power, wind power, solar energy, hydrogen fuel, and fusion energy and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. This course is offered during the last two weeks of the Independent Activities Period (IAP),...

  20. 2.96 / 6.930 / 10.806 / 16.653 / 22.002 Management in Engineering, Fall 2004

    Chun, Jung-Hoon; d'Arbeloff, Alexander
    This course serves as an introduction to engineering management. Topics include financial principles, management of innovation, engineering project planning and control, human factors, career planning, patents, and technical strategy. The case study method of instruction in this course emphasizes student participation in class discussion. This class was also offered in Course 13 (Department of Ocean Engineering) as 13.52. In 2005, ocean engineering subjects became part of Course 2 (Department of Mechanical Engineering), and the 13.52 designation was dropped in lieu of 2.96.

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