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Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (6) -

Mostrando recursos 1 - 20 de 118

  1. 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication, Fall 2008

    Shapiro, Jeffrey
    This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and polarization entanglement; optimum binary detection; quantum precision...

  2. 5.95J / 6.982J / 7.59J / 8.395J / 18.094J / 1.95J / 2.978J Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering, Fall 2012

    Rankin, Janet
    This participatory seminar focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary for teaching science and engineering in higher education. This course is designed for graduate students interested in an academic career, and anyone else interested in teaching. Topics include theories of adult learning; course development; promoting active learning, problem-solving, and critical thinking in students; communicating with a diverse student body; using educational technology to further learning; lecturing; creating effective tests and assignments; and assessment and evaluation. Students research and present a relevant topic of particular interest. The subject is appropriate for both novices and those with teaching experience.

  3. 6.005 Elements of Software Construction, Fall 2011

    Miller, Robert
    This course introduces fundamental principles and techniques of software development. Students learn how to write software that is safe from bugs, easy to understand, and ready for change. Topics include specifications and invariants; testing, test-case generation, and coverage; state machines; abstract data types and representation independence; design patterns for object-oriented programming; concurrent programming, including message passing and shared concurrency, and defending against races and deadlock; and functional programming with immutable data and higher-order functions. The course includes weekly programming exercises and two substantial group projects.

  4. 18.405J / 6.841J Advanced Complexity Theory, Fall 2001

    Spielman, Daniel
    The topics for this course cover various aspects of complexity theory, such as  the basic time and space classes, the polynomial-time hierarchy and the randomized classes . This is a pure theory class, so no applications were involved.

  5. 6.042J / 18.062J Mathematics for Computer Science, Spring 2005

    Leiserson, Charles; Lehman, Eric; Devadas, Srinivas; Meyer, Albert R.
    This course is offered to undergraduates and is an elementary discrete mathematics course oriented towards applications in computer science and engineering. Topics covered include: formal logic notation, induction, sets and relations, permutations and combinations, counting principles, and discrete probability.

  6. 6.042J / 18.062J Mathematics for Computer Science, Spring 2010

    Meyer, Albert R.
    This subject offers an introduction to Discrete Mathematics oriented toward Computer Science and Engineering. The subject coverage divides roughly into thirds: Fundamental concepts of mathematics: definitions, proofs, sets, functions, relations. Discrete structures: graphs, state machines, modular arithmetic, counting. Discrete probability theory. On completion of 6.042, students will be able to explain and apply the basic methods of discrete (noncontinuous) mathematics in Computer Science. They will be able to use these methods in subsequent courses in the design and analysis of algorithms, computability theory, software engineering, and computer systems.

  7. 20.430J / 2.795J / 6.561J / 10.539J / HST.544J Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems (BE.430J), Fall 2004

    Lauffenburger, Douglas; Grodzinsky, Alan
    This course covers the following topics: conduction, diffusion, convection in electrolytes; fields in heterogeneous media; electrical double layers; Maxwell stress tensor and electrical forces in physiological systems; and fluid and solid continua: equations of motion useful for porous, hydrated biological tissues. Case studies considered include membrane transport; electrode interfaces; electrical, mechanical, and chemical transduction in tissues; electrophoretic and electroosmotic flows; diffusion/reaction; and ECG. The course also examines electromechanical and physicochemical interactions in biomaterials and cells; orthopaedic, cardiovascular, and other clinical examples.

  8. 6.047 / 6.878 Computational Biology: Genomes, Networks, Evolution, Fall 2008

    Kellis, Manolis; Galagan, James
    This course focuses on the algorithmic and machine learning foundations of computational biology, combining theory with practice. We study the principles of algorithm design for biological datasets, and analyze influential problems and techniques. We use these to analyze real datasets from large-scale studies in genomics and proteomics. The topics covered include: Genomes: biological sequence analysis, hidden Markov models, gene finding, RNA folding, sequence alignment, genome assembly Networks: gene expression analysis, regulatory motifs, graph algorithms, scale-free networks, network motifs, network evolution Evolution: comparative genomics, phylogenetics, genome duplication, genome rearrangements, evolutionary theory, rapid evolution

  9. 6.231 Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control, Fall 2011

    Bertsekas, Dimitri
    The course covers the basic models and solution techniques for problems of sequential decision making under uncertainty (stochastic control). We will consider optimal control of a dynamical system over both a finite and an infinite number of stages. This includes systems with finite or infinite state spaces, as well as perfectly or imperfectly observed systems. We will also discuss approximation methods for problems involving large state spaces. Applications of dynamic programming in a variety of fields will be covered in recitations.

  10. 2.797J / 3.053J / 6.024J / 20.310J Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Biomechanics, Fall 2006

    Lang, Matthew; Kamm, Roger D.
    This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic properties; chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior; cell mechanics, motility and adhesion; biomembranes; biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors. The class also examines experimental methods for probing structures at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels.

  11. CMS.611J / 6.073J Creating Video Games, Fall 2013

    Tan, Philip B.; Eberhardt, Richard; Verrilli, Sara
    Students will learn creative design and production methods, working together in small teams to design, develop, and thoroughly test their own original digital games. Design iteration across all aspects of video game development (game design, audio design, visual aesthetics, fiction, and programming) will be stressed. Students will also be required to focus test their games, and will need to support and challenge their game design decisions with appropriate focus testing and data analysis.

  12. 6.828 Operating System Engineering, Fall 2006

    Kaashoek, Frans
    6.828 teaches the fundamentals of engineering operating systems. The following topics are studied in detail: virtual memory, kernel and user mode, system calls, threads, context switches, interrupts, interprocess communication, coordination of concurrent activities, and the interface between software and hardware. Most importantly, the interactions between these concepts are examined. The course is divided into two blocks; the first block introduces an operating system, xv6, which runs on x86 SMPs and provides the basic Unix semantics of Unix v6. The second block of lectures covers important operating systems concepts invented after Unix® v6, which was introduced in 1976.

  13. 6.857 Network and Computer Security, Fall 2003

    Rivest, Ronald
    6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

  14. 1.203J / 6.281J / 15.073J / 16.76J / ESD.216J Logistical and Transportation Planning Methods, Fall 2004

    Larson, Richard C.; Odoni, Amedeo R.; Barnett, Arnold
    The class will cover quantitative techniques of Operations Research with emphasis on applications in transportation systems analysis (urban, air, ocean, highway, pick-up and delivery systems) and in the planning and design of logistically oriented urban service systems (e.g., fire and police departments, emergency medical services, emergency repair services). It presents a unified study of functions of random variables, geometrical probability, multi-server queueing theory, spatial location theory, network analysis and graph theory, and relevant methods of simulation. There will be discussion focused on the difficulty of implementation, among other topics.

  15. 6.851 Advanced Data Structures, Spring 2010

    Demaine, Erik; Schulz, André
    Data structures play a central role in modern computer science. You interact with data structures much more often than with algorithms (think of Google, your mail server, and even your network routers). In addition, data structures are essential building blocks in obtaining efficient algorithms. This course will cover major results and current directions of research in data structures.

  16. 6.891 Computational Evolutionary Biology, Fall 2004

    Berwick, Robert
    Why has it been easier to develop a vaccine to eliminate polio than to control influenza or AIDS? Has there been natural selection for a 'language gene'? Why are there no animals with wheels? When does 'maximizing fitness' lead to evolutionary extinction? How are sex and parasites related? Why don't snakes eat grass? Why don't we have eyes in the back of our heads? How does modern genomics illustrate and challenge the field? This course analyzes evolution from a computational, modeling, and engineering perspective. The course has extensive hands-on laboratory exercises in model-building and analyzing evolutionary data.

  17. 6.837 Computer Graphics, Fall 2003

    Durand, Frédo; Cutler, Barbara
    6.837 offers an introduction to computer graphics hardware, algorithms, and software. Topics include: line generators, affine transformations, line and polygon clipping, splines, interactive techniques, perspective projection, solid modeling, hidden surface algorithms, lighting models, shading, and animation. Substantial programming experience is required. This course is worth 6 Engineering Design Points.

  18. 6.685 Electric Machines, Fall 2005

    Kirtley Jr., James L.
    6.685 explores concepts in electromechanics, using electric machinery as examples. It teaches an understanding of principles and analysis of electromechanical systems. By the end of the course, students are capable of doing electromechanical design of the major classes of rotating and linear electric machines and have an understanding of the principles of the energy conversion parts of Mechatronics. In addition to design, students learn how to estimate the dynamic parameters of electric machines and understand what the implications of those parameters are on the performance of systems incorporating those machines.

  19. 6.868J / MAS.731J The Society of Mind, Spring 2007

    Minsky, Marvin
    This course is an introduction to a theory that tries to explain how minds are made from collections of simpler processes. The subject treats such aspects of thinking as vision, language, learning, reasoning, memory, consciousness, ideals, emotions, and personality. Ideas incorporate psychology, artificial intelligence, and computer science to resolve theoretical issues such as whole vs. parts, structural vs. functional descriptions, declarative vs. procedural representations, symbolic vs. connectionist models, and logical vs. common-sense theories of learning.

  20. 14.461 Advanced Macroeconomics I, Fall 2009

    Lorenzoni, Guido; Guerrieri, Veronica
    This course covers three sets of topics. The first part will cover business cycle models with imperfect information. We will ask questions such as: What shocks drive business cycles? What is the relative role of shocks to fundamentals and shocks affecting expectations about (current and future) economic developments? How do informational frictions affect the shape of the responses to various shocks? The second part will cover models of investment with credit constraints. We will ask questions such as: What is the transmission mechanism from shocks to the financial sector to the real economy? What determines optimal decisions about capitalization at...

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