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Literature (21L) - Archived

Mostrando recursos 1 - 20 de 26

  1. 21L.005 Introduction to Drama, Fall 2008

    Fleche, Anne
    Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

  2. 21L.485 20th-Century Fiction, Fall 2002

    Thorburn, David
    Tradition and innovation in representative fiction of the early modern period. Recurring themes: the role of the artist in the modern period, the representation of psychological and sexual experience, the virtues (and defects) of the aggressively experimental character of so many modern books. Works by such writers as Conrad, Kipling, Isaac Babel, Kafka, James, Lawrence, Mann, Ford Madox Ford, Joyce, Woolf, Faulkner, and Nabokov.

  3. 21L.003 Reading Fiction, Fall 2008

    Vaeth, Kimberly
    This course offers students ways to become more engaged and curious readers for life. By learning the language of selected short stories and novels, students learn the language of literary description. There will be a strong emphasis on class discussion and writing. Readings will include fiction by O'Conner, Joyce, Tolstoy, Mann, Shelley, and Baldwin.

  4. 21L.011 The Film Experience, Fall 2012

    Thorburn, David
    This course concentrates on close analysis and criticism of a wide range of films, including works from the early silent period, documentary and avant-garde films, European art cinema, and contemporary Hollywood fare. Through comparative reading of films from different eras and countries, students develop the skills to turn their in-depth analyses into interpretations and explore theoretical issues related to spectatorship. Syllabus varies from term to term, but usually includes such directors as Coppola, Eisentein, Fellini, Godard, Griffith, Hawks, Hitchcock, Kubrick, Kurosawa, Tarantino, Welles, Wiseman, and Zhang.

  5. 21L.451 Introduction to Literary Theory, Spring 2010

    Raman, Shankar
    This subject examines the ways in which we read. It introduces some of the different strategies of reading, comprehending and engaging with literary texts developed in the twentieth century, paying special attention to post-structuralist theories and their legacy. (What poststructuralism means will be discussed often in this course, so don't worry if you don't know what it means right now!) The course is organized around specific theoretical paradigms. In general, we will: (1) work through selected readings in order to see how they determine or define the task of literary interpretation; (2) locate the limits of each particular approach; and...

  6. 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Stoppard and Churchill, Spring 2004

    Henderson, Diana
    What is the interplay between an event and its "frames"? What is special and distinctive about stage events? How and why do contemporary dramatists turn back in time for their settings, models, and materials? How do they play with this material to create performance pieces of importance and delight for modern audiences? How do they create distinct, fresh perspectives using the stage in an era of mass and multi-media? What is the implied audience for these plays, and how does that clash or coincide with actual audience expectations and responses? What information do we "need to know," and what do...

  7. 21L.006 American Literature, Fall 2002

    Kelley, Wyn
    This is a HASS-D CI course. Like other communications-intensive courses in the humanities, arts, and social sciences, it allows students to produce 20 pages of polished writing with careful attention to revision. It also offers substantial opportunities for oral expression, through presentations of written work, student-led discussion, and class participation. The class has a low enrollment that ensures maximum attention to student writing and opportunity for oral expression, and a writing fellow/tutor is available for consultation on drafts and revisions.

  8. 21L.501 The American Novel, Fall 2002

    Kelley, Wyn
    The theme for this class is "American Revolution." We will read authors who record, on the one hand, the failures of the American revolution, with its dream of democracy and freedom for all, and on the other hand the potential for narrative to reenact that revolution successfully. In different ways, these authors overturn traditional or unethical authority through their literary innovations. Although certain classic American historical, political, and cultural issues will be at the center of our study--democracy, slavery, gender equity, social reform--we will concern ourselves primarily with literary strategies, with language and its uses. Essays will pursue close readings...

  9. 21L.011 The Film Experience, Fall 2007

    Thorburn, David
    This course is an introduction to narrative film, emphasizing the unique properties of the movie house and the motion picture camera, the historical evolution of the film medium, and the intrinsic artistic qualities of individual films. The primary focus is on American cinema, but secondary attention is paid to works drawn from other great national traditions, such as France, Italy, and Japan. The syllabus includes such directors as Griffith, Keaton, Chaplin, Renoir, Ford, Hitchcock, Altman, De Sica, and Fellini.

  10. 21L.448J / 21W.739J Darwin and Design, Fall 2009

    Paradis, James
    In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing.

  11. 21L.451 Introduction to Literary Theory, Spring 2004

    Raman, Shankar
    This subject focuses on the ways in which we read, providing an overview of some of the different strategies of reading, comprehending and engaging with literary texts developed in the twentieth century. The course is organized around specific theoretical paradigms. In each case our task will be, first, to work through the selected reading in order to see how it determines or defines the task of literary interpretation; second, to locate the limits of each particular approach; and finally, to trace the emergence of subsequent theoretical paradigms as responses to the achievements and limitations of what came before. The literary...

  12. 21L.000J / 21L.010 / 21W.734J Writing About Literature, Fall 2006

    Kelley, Wyn
    Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers...

  13. 21L.002-3 Foundations of Western Culture II: Modernism, Spring 2004

    Eiland, Howard
    This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have...

  14. 21L.448 / 21W.739J Darwin and Design, Fall 2002

    Paradis, James
    In the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of 'feedback mechanisms' in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, Hardy, H. G. Wells, and Turing. There will be about 100 pages of weekly reading--sometimes fewer, sometimes more. Note: The...

  15. 21L.016 / 21M.616 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance, Spring 2007

    Henderson, Diana; Sonenberg, Janet
    This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Rembrandt and Moliere. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing.

  16. 21L.471 Major English Novels, Spring 2007

    Lipkowitz, Ina
    Subject studies important examples of the literary form that, between the beginning of the eighteenth century and the end of the nineteenth century, became an indispensable instrument for representing modern life, in the hands of such writers as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Burney, Austen, Scott, Dickens, the Brontes, Eliot, Hardy, and Conrad. The class alternates between eighteenth and nineteenth century topics, and may be repeated for credit with instructor's permission. From the course home page: Course Description In this class you will read, think about, and hopefully enjoy important examples of what has become one of the most popular literary...

  17. 21L.007 World Literatures: Contact Zone, Fall 2006

    Braithwaite, Alisa Kim
    World Literatures will focus on the concept of the contact zone. What happens when cultures with different ideologies and norms come into contact with each other through exploration and colonization? We will examine how the complex issues surrounding race, gender, language and power are represented in both poetry and prose from African, Caribbean and South Asian perspectives. Our discussions will focus on not only the historical situations that these texts represent, but also the literary conventions these writers use to express these unique stories.

  18. 21L.472 Major European Novels, Fall 2001

    Kibel, Alvin C.
    A study of changing narrative forms in the nineteenth-century European novel. The changing fortunes of the heroic and romantic ideals. The motif of the outsider as a means for depicting social reality. Readings in Cervantes, Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Proust. From the course home page: Course Description This subject traces the history of the European novel by studying texts that have been influential in that history in connection with two interrelated ideas. The first of these ideas underlies much of our modern regard for the novel as a literary form–namely, the idea that if fiction intends to deal...

  19. 21L.421 Comedy, Fall 2001

    Kelley, Wyn
    Surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, MoliSre, Austen, and Chaplin. From the course home page: Course Description This is a second variation of the course. It includes a survey of a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors studied include Twain, Wilde, Shakespeare, and Cervantes. Like other communications-intensive courses in the humanities, arts, and social sciences, it allows the student to produce a long writing assignment, in addition...

  20. 21L.011 The Film Experience, Fall 2006

    Thorburn, David
    An introduction to narrative film, emphasizing the unique properties of the movie house and the motion-picture camera, the historical evolution of the film medium, and the intrinsic artistic qualities of individual films. Syllabus changes from semester to semester, but usually includes such directors as Griffith, Chaplin, Renoir, Ford, Hitchcock, De Sica, and Fellini. From the course home page: Course Description This course is an introduction to narrative film, emphasizing the unique properties of the movie house and the motion picture camera, the historical evolution of the film medium, and the intrinsic artistic qualities of individual films. The primary focus is...

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