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DSpace at MIT (104.280 recursos)

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Materials Science and Engineering (3) - Archived

Mostrando recursos 1 - 20 de 47

  1. 2.797J / 3.053J / 6.024J / 20.310J Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Biomechanics, Fall 2006

    Lang, Matthew; Kamm, Roger D.
    This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic properties; chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior; cell mechanics, motility and adhesion; biomembranes; biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors. The class also examines experimental methods for probing structures at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels.

  2. HST.523J / 2.785J / 3.97J / 20.411J Cell-Matrix Mechanics, Spring 2004

    Yannas, Ioannis; Spector, Myron
    Mechanical forces play a decisive role during development of tissues and organs, during remodeling following injury as well as in normal function. A stress field influences cell function primarily through deformation of the extracellular matrix to which cells are attached. Deformed cells express different biosynthetic activity relative to undeformed cells. The unit cell process paradigm combined with topics in connective tissue mechanics form the basis for discussions of several topics from cell biology, physiology, and medicine.

  3. 3.021J / 1.021J / 10.333J / 18.361J / 22.00J Introduction to Modeling and Simulation, Spring 2011

    Buehler, Markus; Grossman, Jeffrey
    This subject provides an introduction to modeling and simulation (IM/S), covering continuum methods, atomistic and molecular simulation (e.g. molecular dynamics) as well as quantum mechanics. These tools play an increasingly important role in modern engineering. You will get hands-on training in both the fundamentals and applications of these methods to key engineering problems. The lectures will provide an exposure to areas of application, based on the scientific exploitation of the power of computation. We will use web based applets for simulations and thus extensive programming skills are not required.

  4. 3.044 Materials Processing, Spring 2005

    Kirchain, Randolph; Powell IV, Adam
    The goal of 3.044 is to teach cost-effective and sustainable production of solid material with a desired geometry, structure or distribution of structures, and production volume. Toward this end, it is organized around different types of phase transformations which determine the structure in various processes for making materials, in roughly increasing order of entropy change during those transformations: solid heat treatment, liquid-solid processing, fluid behavior, deformation processing, and vapor-solid processing. The course ends with several lectures that place the subject in the context of society at large.

  5. 3.091 Introduction to Solid State Chemistry, Fall 2004

    Sadoway, Donald
    This course explores the basic principles of chemistry and their application to engineering systems. It deals with the relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order. It also investigates the characterization of atomic arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids: metals, ceramics, semiconductors, and polymers (including proteins). Topics covered include organic chemistry, solution chemistry, acid-base equilibria, electrochemistry, biochemistry, chemical kinetics, diffusion, and phase diagrams. Examples are drawn from industrial practice (including the environmental impact of chemical processes), from energy generation and storage, e.g., batteries and fuel cells, and from emerging technologies, e.g., photonic and biomedical devices.

  6. 3.021J / 1.021J / 10.333J / 18.361J / 22.00J Introduction to Modeling and Simulation, Spring 2008

    Buehler, Markus; Thonhauser, Timo; Radovitzky, Raúl
    This course explores the basic concepts of computer modeling and simulation in science and engineering. We'll use techniques and software for simulation, data analysis and visualization. Continuum, mesoscale, atomistic and quantum methods are used to study fundamental and applied problems in physics, chemistry, materials science, mechanics, engineering, and biology. Examples drawn from the disciplines above are used to understand or characterize complex structures and materials, and complement experimental observations.

  7. 6.972 Game Theory and Mechanism Design, Spring 2005

    Ozdaglar, Asu
    This course is offered to graduates and is an introduction to fundamentals of game theory and mechanism design with motivations drawn from various applications including distributed control of wireline and wireless communication networks, incentive-compatible/dynamic resource allocation, and pricing. Emphasis is placed on the foundations of the theory, mathematical tools, as well as modeling and the equilibrium notions in different environments. Topics covered include: normal form games, learning in games, supermodular games, potential games, dynamic games, subgame perfect equilibrium, bargaining, repeated games, auctions, mechanism design, cooperative game theory, network and congestion games, and price of anarchy.

  8. 6.436J / 15.085J Fundamentals of Probability, Fall 2005

    Tsitsiklis, John
    This is a course on the fundamentals of probability geared towards first or second-year graduate students who are interested in a rigorous development of the subject. The course covers most of the topics in MIT course 6.431 but at a faster pace and in more depth. Topics covered include: probability spaces and measures; discrete and continuous random variables; conditioning and independence; multivariate normal distribution; abstract integration, expectation, and related convergence results; moment generating and characteristic functions; Bernoulli and Poisson processes; finite-state Markov chains; convergence notions and their relations; and limit theorems. Familiarity with elementary notions in probability and real analysis...

  9. 14.42 / 14.420 Environmental Policy and Economics, Spring 2004

    Greenstone, Michael
    This course explores the proper role of government in the regulation of the environment. It will help students develop the tools to estimate the costs and benefits of environmental regulations. These tools will be used to evaluate a series of current policy questions, including: Should air and water pollution regulations be tightened or loosened? What are the costs of climate change in the U.S. and abroad? Is there a "Race to the Bottom" in environmental regulation? Students will help design and execute a cutting edge research project that tests whether air pollution causes infant mortality. To gain real world experience,...

  10. 14.454 Macroeconomic Theory IV, Fall 2004

    Caballero, Ricardo
    This half-term course covers the macroeconomic implications of imperfections in labor markets, goods markets, credit and financial markets. The role of nominal rigidities is also an area of focus.

  11. 14.581 International Economics I, Spring 2007

    Antràs, Pol
    This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the field of international trade. It examines the theory of international trade and foreign investment with applications in commercial policy. Topics include gains from trade, Ricardian models of technological differences, Heckscher-Ohlin models of factor endowment differences, intermediate input trade, wage inequality, imperfect competition, firm heterogeneity, multinational firms, international organization of production, dynamics, trade policy, trade and institutions, sorting in trade and FDI, and effects of geography on trade. This course is targeted to second-year PhD students in economics.

  12. 12.119 Analytical Techniques for Studying Environmental and Geologic Samples, Spring 2006

    Boyle, Edward; Frey, Frederick; Bowring, Samuel; Grove, Timothy
    This is a laboratory course supplemented by lectures that focus on selected analytical facilities that are commonly used to determine the mineralogy, elemental abundance and isotopic ratios of Sr and Pb in rocks, soils, sediments and water.

  13. 12.458 Molecular Biogeochemistry, Fall 2009

    Summons, Roger
    This course evaluates and discusses the formation and diagnostic structural properties of organic compounds with particular emphasis on those molecules which form chemical fossils. The course is structured around the biosynthetic and phylogenetic origins of recalcitrant hydrocarbons.

  14. 12.458 Molecular Biogeochemistry, Fall 2006

    Summons, Roger
    This course covers all aspects of molecular biosignatures from their pathways of lipid biosynthesis, the distribution patterns of lipid biosynthetic pathways with regard to phylogeny and physiology, isotopic contents, occurrence in modern organisms and environments, diagenetic pathways, analytical techniques and the occurrence of molecular fossils through the geological record.

  15. 12.001 Introduction to Geology, Spring 2008

    Elkins-Tanton, Lindy
    This undergraduate level course presents a basic study in geology. It introduces major minerals and rock types, rock-forming processes, and time scales; temperatures, pressures, compositions, structure of the Earth, and measurement techniques; geologic structures and relationships observable in the field; sediment movement and landform development by moving water, wind, and ice; crustal processes and planetary evolution in terms of global plate tectonics with an emphasis on ductile and brittle processes.

  16. 4.651 20th Century Art, Fall 2002

    Jones, Caroline
    Critical examination of major developments in European and American art during the past century. Surveys art's engagements with modernization, radical politics, utopianism, mass culture, changing conceptions of mind and human nature, new technologies, colonialism and postcolonialism, and other significant aspects of recent history.

  17. 10.391J / 1.818J / 2.65J / 3.564J / 11.371J / 22.811J / ESD.166J Sustainable Energy, Spring 2005

    Drake, Elisabeth; Tester, Jefferson W.; Golay, Michael
    The assessment of current and potential future energy systems is covered in this course and includes topics on resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Detailed information on the course textbook can be found here: Tester, J. W., E. M. Drake, M. W. Golay, M. J. Driscoll, and W....

  18. 20.441 / 2.79J / 3.96J / HST.522J Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (BE.441), Fall 2003

    Yannas, Ioannis; Spector, Myron
    This course is an introduction to principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Topics include methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. It also covers mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Other areas include tissue and organ regeneration; design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions; comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and...

  19. 3.40J / 22.71J Physical Metallurgy, Spring 2004

    Russell, Kenneth; van Vliet, Krystyn
    This course examines how the presence of 1-, 2- and 3D defects and second phases control the mechanical, electromagnetic and chemical behavior of metals and alloys. It considers point, line and interfacial defects in the context of structural transformations including annealing, spinodal decomposition, nucleation, growth, and particle coarsening. In addition, it concentrates on structure-function relationships, and in particular how grain size, interstitial and substitutional solid solutions, and second-phase particles impact mechanical and other properties. Examples include microelectronic circuitry, magnetic memory and drug delivery applications.

  20. 3.14 Physical Metallurgy, Fall 2003

    Schuh, Chris
    The central point of this course is to provide a physical basis that links the structure of metals with their properties. With this understanding in hand, the concepts of alloy design and microstructural engineering are also discussed, linking processing and thermodynamics to the structure and properties of metals.

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