Recursos de colección

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Biological Engineering (BE) - Archived

Mostrando recursos 1 - 16 de 16

  1. BE.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials, Spring 2003

    Irvine, Darrell J.
    Analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, biosensors, and cell-guiding surfaces.

  2. BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials, Fall 2005

    Zhang, Shuguang, Dr.
    Basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. Molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, including collagen, silk, bone, protein adhesives, GFP, self-assembling peptides. Molecular design of new biological materials for nanotechnology, biocomputing and regenerative medicine. Graduate students are expected to complete additional coursework. Description from course home page: This course, intended for both graduate and upper level undergraduate students, will focus on understanding of the basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. It will address the molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, such as several types of collagen, silk, spider silk, wool, hair, bones, shells, protein adhesives,...

  3. 6.021J / 2.791J / 2.794J / 6.521J / BE.370J / BE.470J / HST.541J Quantitative Physiology: Cells and Tissues, Fall 2002

    Freeman, Dennis M.; Weiss, Thomas Fischer; Poe, Mya
    Principles of mass transport and electrical signal generation for biological membranes, cells, and tissues. Mass transport through membranes: diffusion, osmosis, chemically mediated, and active transport. Electric properties of cells: ion transport; equilibrium, resting, and action potentials. Kinetic and molecular properties of single voltage-gated ion channels. Laboratory and computer exercises illustrate the concepts. For juniors and seniors. Students engage in extensive written and oral communication exercises. Meets with graduate subject 6.521J, but assignments differ.

  4. BE.430J Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems, Fall 2004

    Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.
    This course covers the following topics: conduction, diffusion, convection in electrolytes; fields in heterogeneous media; electrical double layers; Maxwell stress tensor and electrical forces in physiological systems; and fluid and solid continua: equations of motion useful for porous, hydrated biological tissues. Case studies considered include membrane transport; electrode interfaces; electrical, mechanical, and chemical transduction in tissues; electrophoretic and electroosmotic flows; diffusion/reaction; and ECG. The course also examines electromechanical and physicochemical interactions in biomaterials and cells; orthopaedic, cardiovascular, and other clinical examples.

  5. BE.102 Macroepidemiology, Spring 2005

    Thilly, William G.
    This course presents a unique and challenging perspective on the causes of human disease and mortality. The course focuses on analyses of major causes of mortality in the US since 1900: cancer cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes, infectious diseases. Students create analytical models to derive estimates for historically variant population risk factors and physiological rate parameters, and conduct analyses of familial data to separately estimate inherited and environmental risks. The course evaluates the basic population genetics of dominant, recessive and non-deleterious inherited risk factors.

  6. BE.010J Introduction to Bioengineering, Spring 2006

    Belcher, Angela M.; Matsudaira, Paul T.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.
    Designed as a freshmen seminar course, faculty from various School of Engineering departments describe the research and educational opportunities specific to and offered by their departments. Background lectures by the BE.010J staff introduce students to the fundamental scientific basis for bioengineering. Specially produced videos provide additional background information that is supplemented with readings from newspaper and magazine articles. Description from course home page: Bioengineering at MIT is represented by the diverse curricula offered by most Departments in the School of Engineering. This course samples the wide variety of bioengineering options for students who plan to major in one of the...

  7. BE.453J Biomedical Information Technology, Spring 2005

    Dewey, C. Forbes (Clarence Forbes)
    The objective of this subject is to teach the design of contemporary information systems for biological and medical data. These data are growing at a prodigious rate, and new information systems are required. This subject will cover examples from biology and medicine to illustrate complete life cycle information systems, beginning with data acquisition, following to data storage and finally to retrieval and analysis. Design of appropriate databases, client-server strategies, data interchange protocols, and computational modeling architectures will be covered. Students are expected to have some familiarity with scientific application software and a basic understanding of at least one contemporary programming...

  8. BE.450 Molecular and Cellular Pathophysiology, Spring 2005

    Schauer, David
    This courses focuses on the fundamentals of tissue and organ response to injury from a molecular and cellular perspective. There is a special emphasis on disease states that bridge infection, inflammation, immunity, and cancer. The systems approach to pathophysiology includes lectures, critical evaluation of recent scientific papers, and student projects and presentations. This term, we focus on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), chronic-active hepatitis, and hepatitis virus infections. In addition to lectures, students work in teams to critically evaluate and present primary scientific papers.

  9. BE.011J Statistical Thermodynamics of Biomolecular Systems, Spring 2004

    Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly; Griffith, Linda G.
    This course provides an introduction to the physical chemistry of biological systems. Topics include: connection of macroscopic thermodynamic properties to microscopic molecular properties using statistical mechanics, chemical potentials, equilibrium states, binding cooperativity, behavior of macromolecules in solution and at interfaces, and solvation. Example problems include protein structure, genomic analysis, single molecule biomechanics, and biomaterials.

  10. BE.440 Analysis of Biological Networks, Fall 2004

    Essigmann, John; Sasisekharan, Ram
    This class analyzes complex biological processes from the molecular, cellular, extracellular, and organ levels of hierarchy. Emphasis is placed on the basic biochemical and biophysical principles that govern these processes. Examples of processes to be studied include chemotaxis, the fixation of nitrogen into organic biological molecules, growth factor and hormone mediated signaling cascades, and signaling cascades leading to cell death in response to DNA damage. In each case, the availability of a resource, or the presence of a stimulus, results in some biochemical pathways being turned on while others are turned off. The course examines the dynamic aspects of these...

  11. BE.010J / 2.790J / 6.025J / 7.38J / 10.010J Introduction to Bioengineering, Spring 2005

    Matsudaira, Paul T.; Belcher, Angela M.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.
    Designed as a freshmen seminar course, faculty from various School of Engineering departments describe the research and educational opportunities specific to and offered by their departments. Background lectures by the BE.010J staff introduce students to the fundamental scientific basis for bioengineering. Specially produced videos provide additional background information that is supplemented with readings from newspaper and magazine articles.

  12. BE.410J Molecular, Cellular and Tissue Biomechanics, Spring 2003

    Kamm, Roger D.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Doyle, Patrick S.; Jonas, Maxine
    This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include: structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic properties; chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior; cell mechanics, motility and adhesion; biomembranes; biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors. Experimental methods for probing structures at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels.

  13. BE.104J Chemicals in the Environment: Toxicology and Public Health, Spring 2005

    Sherley, James L.; Tannenbaum, Steven R., 1937-; Green, Laura C.
    This course addresses the challenges of defining a relationship between exposure to environmental chemicals and human disease. Course topics include epidemiological approaches to understanding disease causation; biostatistical methods; evaluation of human exposure to chemicals, and their internal distribution, metabolism, reactions with cellular components, and biological effects; and qualitative and quantitative health risk assessment methods used in the U.S. as bases for regulatory decision-making. Throughout the term, students consider case studies of local and national interest.

  14. BE.420J Biomolecular Kinetics and Cellular Dynamics, Fall 2004

    Wittrup, K. Dane; Tidor, Bruce
    This subject deals primarily with kinetic and equilibrium mathematical models of biomolecular interactions, as well as the application of these quantitative analyses to biological problems across a wide range of levels of organization, from individual molecular interactions to populations of cells.

  15. BE.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions, Fall 2003

    Spector, Myron; Yannas, Ioannis V.
    Principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. Mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Tissue and organ regeneration. Design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions. Comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to case studies. Criteria for restoration of physiological function for...

  16. BE.442 Molecular Structure of Biological Materials, Fall 2002

    Zhang, Shuguang, Dr.
    Basic molecular structural principles of biological materials. Molecular structures of various materials of biological origin, including collagen, silk, bone, protein adhesives, GFP, self-assembling peptides. Molecular design of new biological materials for nanotechnology, biocomputing and regenerative medicine. Graduate students are expected to complete additional coursework.

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