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Women's and Gender Studies (WGS) - Archived

Mostrando recursos 1 - 20 de 41

  1. 21A.232J / WGS.172J Rethinking the Family, Sex, and Gender, Fall 2010

    Paxson, Heather
    Through investigating cross-cultural case studies, this course introduces students to the anthropological study of the social institutions and symbolic meanings of family, household, gender, and sexuality. We will explore the myriad forms that families and households take and evaluate their social, emotional, and economic dynamics.

  2. WGS.111 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media, Fall 2008

    Surkan, K.J.
    This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment...

  3. WGS.110 Sexual and Gender Identities, Fall 2010

    Surkan, K.J.
    This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

  4. SP.401 / WGS.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, Fall 2010

    Walsh, Andrea; Fox, Elizabeth
    This course offers an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that asks critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, work, medicine and the family.

  5. WGS.101 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, Fall 2010

    Walsh, Andrea; Fox, Elizabeth
    This course offers an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that asks critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, work, medicine and the family.

  6. SP.601J / 17.006 / 24.237 / WGS.601J Feminist Political Thought, Spring 2010

    Wood, Elizabeth A.
    In this course we will examine the development of feminist theory over time. Some subjects we will examine in detail include suffrage and equality; radical feminism; psychoanalysis and feminism; theories of power; sexuality and gender; embodied knowledge; pornography; identities and global feminism; militarism; and the welfare state. Throughout the course we will analyze different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, sexuality and morality.

  7. 21A.225J / SP.621J / WGS.621J Violence, Human Rights, and Justice, Fall 2004

    James, Erica
    This course examines the contemporary problem of political violence and the way that human rights have been conceived as a means to protect and promote freedom, peace and justice for citizens against the abuses of the state.

  8. 21A.216J / SP.622J / WGS.622J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good?, Spring 2005

    James, Erica
    This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

  9. SP.401 / WGS.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, Spring 2009

    Surkan, Kim
    This course is designed as an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Women's and Gender Studies, an academic area of study focused on the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political contexts. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. This semester you will become acquainted with many of the critical questions and concepts feminist scholars have developed as tools for thinking about gendered experience. In addition, we will study the interconnections among systems of oppression (such as sexism,...

  10. 21W.742J / SP.575J / WGS.575J Writing About Race, Spring 2007

    Faery, Rebecca Blevins
    In The Souls of Black Folk (1903), the great cultural critic W. E. B. Du Bois wrote that "...the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color line." A century after Du Bois penned those words, most Americans would agree that at the beginning of the twenty-first century, the color line remains one of our most pressing social issues. In this course, we will explore the terrain of race in America by reading the works of writers of color and others concerned with the issue of race, by viewing films that address racial issues, and by writing...

  11. MAS.963 Ambient Intelligence, Spring 2004

    Maes, Patricia
    This course focuses on Ambient Intelligence, and how it envisions a world where people are surrounded by intelligent and intuitive interfaces embedded in the everyday objects around them. These interfaces recognize and respond to the presence and behavior of an individual in a personalized and relevant way. Students are required to do extensive literary research on the subject and participate in class discussions.

  12. SP.691 / WGS.691 Studies in Women's Life Narratives: Feminist Inquiry, Spring 2009

    Maher, Frinde; Bergland, Renee
    Feminist Inquiry starts with questions: What is feminism? What is feminist scholarship? Is feminist scholarship inherently interdisciplinary? Must feminist work interrogate disciplinarity? Must feminists collaborate? Our aim is to promote the development of feminist theory and methods by providing a forum for sharing, assessing, discussing and debating strategies used by feminist scholars to study topics such as gender and the body; sexualities; color and whiteness; migration, colonialism, and indigeneity.

  13. 17.118J / SP.412J / WGS.412J Feminist Political Thought, Fall 2000

    Wood, Elizabeth A.
    This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of political theory. In addition we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race...

  14. 18.152 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations, Fall 2004

    Staffilani, Gigliola; Vasy, Andras
    This course analyzes initial and boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations and the wave and heat equation in one space dimension. It also covers the Sturm-Liouville theory and eigenfunction expansions, as well as the Dirichlet problem for Laplace's operator and potential theory.

  15. 11.124 Introduction to Teaching and Learning Mathematics and Science, Fall 2004

    Klopfer, Eric
    This course provides an introduction to teaching and learning in a variety of K-12 settings. Through visits to schools, classroom discussions, selected readings, and hands-on activities, we explore the challenges and opportunities of teaching. Topics of study include educational technology, design and experimentation, student learning, and careers in education.

  16. 6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation, Fall 2004

    Miller, Robert
    6.831 introduces the principles of user interface development, focusing on three key areas: Design: How to design good user interfaces, starting with human capabilities (including the human information processor model, perception, motor skills, color, attention, and errors) and using those capabilities to drive design techniques: task analysis, user-centered design, iterative design, usability guidelines, interaction styles, and graphic design principles. Implementation: Techniques for building user interfaces, including low-fidelity prototypes, Wizard of Oz, and other prototyping tools; input models, output models, model-view-controller, layout, constraints, and toolkits. Evaluation: Techniques for evaluating and measuring interface usability, including heuristic evaluation, predictive evaluation, and user testing....

  17. 11.131 Educational Theory and Practice III, Spring 2007

    Klopfer, Eric; Gibb, Reen
    This is the final course in the three course sequence (11.129, 11.130 and 11.131) that deals with the practicalities of teaching students. Our areas of study will include: educational psychology, identification of useful resources that support instruction, learning to use technology in meaningful ways in the classroom, finding more methods of motivating students, implementing differentiated instruction and obtaining a teaching job.

  18. 21M.220 Early Music, Spring 2007

    Cuthbert, Michael Scott
    This class covers the history of Western music from antiquity until approximately 1680, about 2000 years worth of music. Rather than cover each topic at the same level of depth, we will focus on four topics in particular and glue them together with a broad overview of other topics. The four topics chosen for this term are (1) chant structure, performance, and development; (2) 14th century music of Italy and France; (3) Elizabethan London; and (4) Venice in the Baroque era. The class will also introduce many of the tools we use in studying music history such as manuscript study,...

  19. 11.165 / 11.477 Infrastructure in Crisis: Energy and Security Challenges, Fall 2009

    Polenske, Karen R.; Ratanawaraha, Apiwat
    The purpose of this seminar is to examine efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions to create, finance and regulate infrastructure systems and services that affect energy security. We will introduce a variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives. During the seminar, students will explore how an energy crisis can be an opportunity for making fundamental changes to improve collapsing infrastructure networks. The sessions will be used to introduce the challenges to modern society concerning energy security, and for students to study how food security and energy security are intertwined, as well as how infrastructure supports the energy system. We...

  20. 12.086 / 12.586 Modeling Environmental Complexity, Fall 2008

    Rothman, Daniel
    This course provides an introduction to the study of environmental phenomena that exhibit both organized structure and wide variability—i.e., complexity. Through focused study of a variety of physical, biological, and chemical problems in conjunction with theoretical models, we learn a series of lessons with wide applicability to understanding the structure and organization of the natural world. Students will also learn how to construct minimal mathematical, physical, and computational models that provide informative answers to precise questions.

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