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Asia Society Museum

Mostrando recursos 1 - 20 de 269

  1. Bottle


    Although Korean ceramics remain relatively unknown in the West, they have long been studied in East Asia. The history of Korean ceramics can be traced back to about 5000 BCE, when simple earthenwares were made and used. Some of the most appealing and charming Korean ceramics date to the period of the Three Kingdoms (c. 57 BCE-CE 668). During this time, Korea was controlled by three or four different kingdoms: Koguryo in the north and Shilla (or Early Shilla), Paekche, and Kaya in the south. The presence in this list of Kaya, which could be called a fourth kingdom, reflects...

  2. Ganesha


    Ganesha, the son of Shiva, is one of three principal deities in the Hindu pantheon. His lion-skin skirt (barely visible on this sculpture), the snake in his headdress, his matted hair, and his dancing posture all signify his relationship to Shiva, who also bears these attributes. In this representation, ten-armed Ganesha is accompanied by several musicians, arrayed around his head and playing cymbals or drums. Seven of Ganesha's hands form gestures commonly used in dance, while the other three hold a rosary, a snake, and a broken tusk. The tusk alludes to a well-known tale in which the portly Ganesha...

  3. Vishnu


    A rare example of a 7th-century stone image of the Hindu god Vishnu from eastern India. Although this sculpture's hands, which would have held identifying attributes, are missing, the figure is identified as Vishnu by his crown and the treatment of his hair, which is neatly coiffed and distinguishes Vishnu from Shiva, whose hair is usually matted. Vishnu is the Great Preserver in the Hindu pantheon and is often portrayed in jewels and ornaments befitting a royal figure. This sculpture and other pieces in the same style are often associated with the rule of King Adityasena, a member of the...

  4. Head of Vishnu


    The diversity of style and iconography in sculptures produced in mainland Southeast Asia from the 6th through 9th centuries reflects the many regional cultures then thriving in that part of the world. In general, two systems of classification are used to help define the regional styles found here: one relies on political terms such as "Dvaravati" and "pre-Angkor," while the more recent system groups by language and/or ethnic types such as Mon and Khmer. It is not certain what ethnic group was responsible for the production of this head. The identification as Vishnu is based on the headdress, known as...

  5. Bamboo in Mist

    Ike Taiga
    Several questions exist regarding this Japanese ink painting entitled Bamboo in Mist. The painting is signed Kasho, one of the artist-names used by Ike Taiga (1723-1776). Taiga was one of the most important painters of the literati school (nanga) in Japan. The signature, placed at the upper right of the painting, follows an inscription that reads 'clear mist in the upper garden.' Two of Taiga's seals, one reading ike arima no in and the other sangaku doja, are impressed beneath the signature. A third seal reading zenshin soma hokkyo is impressed toward the bottom of the painting in the center...

  6. Buddha


    This bronze sculpture of the Buddha exemplifies the continuing strength of Gupta-style conventions, particularly in northeastern India, during the 6th and 7th centuries. The Gupta period, which lasted from about 319 to about 500, was a period of enormous prosperity and flourishing in the arts. A relatively uniform style is found in sculpture throughout the Gupta empire. This "classic" style spread through much of India, and proceeded to influence the art of places as diverse as Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Java, contributing significantly to the development of religious art, both Buddhist and Hindu in Southeast Asia.The city of Sarnath, located...

  7. Woman Wiping Her Neck

    Choki, Eishosai
    The technique of printing with blocks of wood has a long history in Japan. From the 8th through 16th centuries, it was primarily used for the mass production of Buddhist texts and icons. By the mid-17th century, books and single-sheet prints, often featuring scenes of city life based on contemporary literature, were produced to satisfy the demand of a growing and wealthy urban class for arts that reflected their interests and activities. Teahouses, brothels, and puppet and Kabuki theaters--clustered together on the outskirts of Tokyo, Kyoto, and Osaka--constituted their primary amusements, and these townsmen celebrated a life style free from...

  8. Dish


    A change from delicate shapes and elegant designs to larger, bolder forms and new decorative motifs distinguishes Chinese ceramics produced from the late 15th through mid-17th century. This change reflects both the weakening of imperial control and the development of new domestic and foreign markets in response to the loss of imperial patronage. Imperial ceramics were produced during the reigns of the Hongzhi (1488-1505), Zhengde (1506-1521), Jiajing (1522-1566), Longqing (1567-1572), and Wanli (1573-1620) emperors. By the end of the Wanli reign, however, the production of imperial ceramics was officially halted, largely because money had to be raised to cover the...

  9. Duck-Shaped Vessel


    The history of pottery in Southeast Asia reflects complicated relationships among the ceramics of the region's different countries and peoples, as well as with the ceramics of China to the north. This charming duck-shaped vessel attests to the internationalism of Vietnamese traditions during the 15th century. In China, the motif of a single or a pair of mandarin ducks often symbolizes marital bliss; however, duck-shaped vessels were not common in Chinese ceramics. It is possible that the impetus behind the development of this vessel comes from the Indonesian tradition of the kendi, a drinking vessel distinguished by a spherical body...

  10. Head of Buddha


    Most of the earliest known images of buddhas and other Buddhist deities were produced in northwest India during the Kushan period, about six hundred years after the religion was founded. There were two major centers of Kushan culture, each with its distinctive style: art from the city of Mathura in Uttar Pradesh displays a traditional Indian aesthetic, while art from Gandhara shows the impact of Hellenistic and Roman sculpture, owing to the sustained effect of Alexander the Great's conquest of the region in the 4th century BCE. The influence of Greek and Roman prototypes is evident in the wavy hair...

  11. Celestial Entertainer


    Idealized feminine forms often adorned the exterior and interior of Hindu temples. Their function was to entertain the gods, but also to remind the faithful of the sanctity of the temple--which, like a heaven, is filled continually with music and dance. This celestial entertainer under a flowering tree was originally a bracket situated above one of eight pillars in a Hindu temple hallway and was intended to be viewed from below. She holds a pair of cymbals commonly used by dancers, and her dense jewelry, broad shoulders, tiny waist, and full thighs are typical of sculpture from Karnataka. The exaggerated...

  12. Dish with Foliate Rim


    The development of certain types of Japanese ceramics, such as Iga and Mino wares, and the use of ceramics for serving food and eating are linked to the evolution of the tea ceremony (chanoyu) in Japan. The drinking of powdered green tea (matcha) whipped with boiling water came from China to Japan at the end of the 12th century together with the Zen sect of Buddhism and a certain complex of cultural practices, philosophical pursuits, and artistic styles. This tea was first used in Zen monasteries as an aid to meditation and as a part of formal gatherings. The drinking...

  13. Bowl


    The rapid development and diversification of the Japanese porcelain industry in the 17th century is one of the most fascinating episodes in the history of ceramics. During this period, the city of Arita, located in the Saga Prefecture in Hizen Province on the southern island of Kyushu, became the largest and most important center for the production of porcelain in the world. Several factors contributed to this development. One was the contribution of the many technically advanced potters brought to Japanfrom Korea during the late 16th-century Japanese invasions of that country. Another was the prohibitive effects of the civil disarray...

  14. Dish


    Ceramics made in China during the Song period (960-1279) are among the most influential and revered in the world: they are noted for their elegant, simple shapes, their lush glazes, and their lively designs. These ceramics are admired in part because of the complicated and varied technologies used in their manufacture. Since the late 12th and early 13th centuries, five of the wares produced during this period--Ding, Ru, Jun, Guan, and Ge--have been designated the "five great wares" of China.The design of a dragon chasing a pearl among swirling clouds found on the interior of this dish dated to the...

  15. Vase


    Ceramics made in China during the Song period (960-1279) are among the most influential and revered in the world: they are noted for their elegant, simple shapes, lush glazes, and lively designs. These ceramics are admired in part because of the complicated and varied technologies used in their manufacture. Song ceramics are categorized into wares that often take the names of their areas of production. Cizhou wares, such as the zun-shaped vase seen here, are thickly potted, boldly decorated ceramics that were produced for popular consumption The Cizhou kilns were located in Ci Prefecture, Hebei Province, but this type of...

  16. Bodhisattva Maitreya


    The diversity of style and iconography in sculptures produced in mainland Southeast Asia from the 6th through 9th centuries reflects the many regional cultures then thriving in that part of the world. In general, two systems of classification are used to

  17. Celestial Entertainer


    This image of a female celestial entertainer characterizes the style of sculpture produced in 11th-century Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh. The performer twists dramatically, lifting one hand above her head while placing the other (now missing) at her side. She wears a crown, armlet, earrings, and two heavy necklaces, one long and one short. The girdle of beads around her waist and legs, and the elaborate treatment of her jewelry--seen for example in the dense incised lines representing the folds of her skirt and lavish amount of beads used to make her jewelry--are typical features of 11th-century sculpture in the region....

  18. Bowl with Foliate Rim


    Although Korean ceramics remain relatively unknown in the West, they have long been studied in East Asia. Stonewares with pale gray-green glazes are among the items listed as 'first under heaven' by the 12th-century Chinese author Taiping Laoren, and this type of Korean ceramic is the only non-Chinese item on his list. Korea's famous green-glazed wares also appear in The Illustrated Description of the Chinese Embassy to Korea during the Xuanhe Period (Xuanhe fengsi Gaoli tujing) of about 1124 by the envoy Xu Jing, who described the glaze as sharing 'the radiance of jade and the crystal clarity of water.'Green-glazed...

  19. Dish


    The history of the Chinese ceramic industry from the late 13th to the early 15th century is one of constant innovation in both technology and taste. Unlike the earlier Song period, during which a wide range of types was produced in kilns throughout China, during the Yuan (1279-1368) and Ming (1368-1644) dynasties, most ceramics were produced at the Jingdezhen kiln complexes located in Jiangxi Province. Some of the earliest porcelain in the world was manufactured at this complex, the site of some of the most important technical innovations and refinements in the history of ceramics, including the perfection of the...

  20. Head of Buddha


    The diversity of style and iconography in sculptures produced in mainland Southeast Asia from the 6th through 9th centuries reflects the many regional cultures then thriving in that part of the world. In general, two systems of classification are used tohelp define the regional styles found here: one relies on political terms, such as 'Dvaravati' and 'pre-Angkor,' while the more recent system groups by language and/or ethnic types such as Mon and Khmer. The high cheekbones, broad nose, and full lips of this head of a Buddha typify Mon-style buddha images. Mon-speaking peoples controlled the regions of Thailand where sculptures...

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