Mostrando recursos 1 - 20 de 397

  1. Human detection and tracking

    Bellotto, Nicola; Cosar, Serhan; Yan, Zhi
    In robotics, detecting and tracking moving objects is key to implementing useful and safe robot behaviours. Identifying which of the detected objects are humans is particularly important for domestic and public environments. Typically the robot is required to collect environmental data of the surrounding area using its on-board sensors, estimating where humans are and where they are going to. Moreover, robots should detect and track humans accurately and as early as possible in order to have enough time to react accordingly

  2. Theories of rapists

    Bartels, Ross; Gannon, Theresa
    .

  3. Whigs and Liberals

    Packer, Ian
    The historiography of the British Liberal party has been dominated by one ques- tion: why did it decline from the governing party in 1914 into insignificance by the 1930s? This is the only example in British politics of one of the two main parties losing its leading role, so it is not surprising that it has generated an enormous literature and has coloured virtually every aspect of how the Liberal party, and the Whig grouping which was one of its main precursors, have been viewed. In general, long-term explanations of the party’s fall, based on changes in British society, have...

  4. Whigs and Liberals

    Packer, Ian
    The historiography of the British Liberal party has been dominated by one ques- tion: why did it decline from the governing party in 1914 into insignificance by the 1930s? This is the only example in British politics of one of the two main parties losing its leading role, so it is not surprising that it has generated an enormous literature and has coloured virtually every aspect of how the Liberal party, and the Whig grouping which was one of its main precursors, have been viewed. In general, long-term explanations of the party’s fall, based on changes in British society, have...

  5. The Aussie 1918-1931: cartoons, digger remembrance and First World War identity

    Chapman, Jane
    Feelings of community, cultural definition and memory were kept alive through the soldiers’ mass circulation tabloid, the Aussie, examined here in the light of theorisation of memory and representation, applied to both text and cartoons. The publication's aim for veterans’ values to become shared national values is analysed in the light of its high-profile usage of soft cartoon humour and also of nostalgia—highlighting the limitations as well as the effectiveness in terms of Australia's evolving national identity. When the post-war economic situation worsened, deeper issues of national tension were glossed over by the use of scapegoats such as “profiteers” and...

  6. Black internationalism and citizenship: voices in print during the aftermaths of war

    Chapman, Jane
    This monograph deals with traces of early black journalism in the widest sense of the word – as public articulations with implications for concepts of citizenship. As a sequel to the 2013 monograph Gender, Citizenship and Newspapers, this books focuses on race and ethnicity, with implications for class, memory, identity studies, and study of popular, ephemeral archival texts. The study positions itself at the boundaries between media history and literary/language studies by comparing newspaper archives as a voice for black people to other literary non-fiction articulations by them such as pamphlets, and memoirs. At the same time, the book makes...

  7. Comparative reflections on cartoons as snapshot, narrative and source

    Chapman, Jane; Allison, Kate; Whittaker, Jason; Kerr, Andrew; Cafferkey, John
    Comparative Reflections on Cartoons as Snapshot, Narrative and Source. Throughout the 20th century, cartoons relentlessly appeared in all sorts of newspapers. This paper argues that, in both Britain and Ireland, the range and impact of public sphere cartoons acting as a cultural record for researchers, is a diverse one that can be broken down into 3 functions: narrative, snapshot and context/voice – the latter representing a methodological approach that differs from historians’ traditional and sparing use of cartoons in a referential way. Some comparative analysis will also be offered of differing contexts and approaches in mainland Britain as opposed to...

  8. Comparative reflections on cartoons as snapshot, narrative and source

    Chapman, Jane; Allison, Kate; Whittaker, Jason; Kerr, Andrew; Cafferkey, John
    Comparative Reflections on Cartoons as Snapshot, Narrative and Source. Throughout the 20th century, cartoons relentlessly appeared in all sorts of newspapers. This paper argues that, in both Britain and Ireland, the range and impact of public sphere cartoons acting as a cultural record for researchers, is a diverse one that can be broken down into 3 functions: narrative, snapshot and context/voice – the latter representing a methodological approach that differs from historians’ traditional and sparing use of cartoons in a referential way. Some comparative analysis will also be offered of differing contexts and approaches in mainland Britain as opposed to...

  9. Deportation or repatriation? African and Afro-Caribbean voices from 1919

    Chapman, Jane
    The book dissects the uncomfortable and sometimes painful history of events during 1919 after the race riots, through records of personal stories in government colonial archives for the West Indies, West Africa, and Britain. The immediate post war period was the most troubled period of peace that the world had hitherto seen, prompting the author to argue that the aftermaths of war need to be given more attention as a distinctly defined period of post-conflict adjustment, in which individual minority voices should be highlighted. This study represents the first systematic attempt to analyse records of people of Afro-Caribbean origin who appealed...

  10. And labor came to us: making use of an opportune workforce - enhancing migrant integration into British economy

    Hack-polay, Dieu; Mendy, John
    This article considers the opportunities presented by the availability of migrant labor in the U.K. employment market and its utilization. The research found that despite their qualifications, migrant labor is underutilized, thereby resulting in a readily available workforce being shunned and excluded from participative integration. This raises economic and ethical questions whose exploration revealed structural barriers (individually, communally, and institutionally) that impeded migrants’ fulfillment of citizenship obligations to host communities and U.K. businesses. The article’s key contribution is to highlight a skills mismatch and the persistent absence of institutional, communal, and strategic frameworks to support migrants’ integration.

  11. And labor came to us: making use of an opportune workforce - enhancing migrant integration into British economy

    Hack-polay, Dieu; Mendy, John
    This article considers the opportunities presented by the availability of migrant labor in the U.K. employment market and its utilization. The research found that despite their qualifications, migrant labor is underutilized, thereby resulting in a readily available workforce being shunned and excluded from participative integration. This raises economic and ethical questions whose exploration revealed structural barriers (individually, communally, and institutionally) that impeded migrants’ fulfillment of citizenship obligations to host communities and U.K. businesses. The article’s key contribution is to highlight a skills mismatch and the persistent absence of institutional, communal, and strategic frameworks to support migrants’ integration.

  12. The humanist Don Quixote and the windmills of sustainability

    Carter, Doina
    This chapter looks at how innovative pedagogy transformed a humanities subject to make the module more immediately relevant to architectural education, the profession and society, while improving engagement of an increasingly diverse student population. This was achieved through didactic shifts: from word to image, from individual, passive study to social, active, participatory, experiential and interdisciplinary learning, from pure theory to practical applications of theory. Militating for the survival of humanities subjects challenges the current societal (and pedagogical) trope that by concentrating on ‘sustainability’ subjects, Architecture schools will produce perfectly trained new generations of specialists able to create a sustainable future. The...

  13. The humanist Don Quixote and the windmills of sustainability

    Carter, Doina
    This chapter looks at how innovative pedagogy transformed a humanities subject to make the module more immediately relevant to architectural education, the profession and society, while improving engagement of an increasingly diverse student population. This was achieved through didactic shifts: from word to image, from individual, passive study to social, active, participatory, experiential and interdisciplinary learning, from pure theory to practical applications of theory. Militating for the survival of humanities subjects challenges the current societal (and pedagogical) trope that by concentrating on ‘sustainability’ subjects, Architecture schools will produce perfectly trained new generations of specialists able to create a sustainable future. The...

  14. Creative hubs versus creative networks

    Bandinelli, C.; Gandini, A.
    This chapter offers an account of the relationship between hubs and networks in the creative economy. Reflecting on ethnographic research conducted by the authors in the UK and Italy, the chapter contends that hubs have emerged as heterotopic spaces that fulfil the need of a space where social commitment and entrepreneurial attitude can be nurtured to facilitate social and professional collaboration among workers. Yet, this is often an idealised form of collaboration, which ultimately serves individual rather than common or shared goals. The chapter discusses the irredeemable interaction and intersection between hubs and networks and identifies the emergence of a...

  15. British DiGRA 2017/2018

    Ruffino, Paolo; MacCallum-Stewart, Esther; Crawford, Garry
    Edited collection of papers of the British section of the Digital Games Research Association

  16. Future gaming: creative interventions in video game culture

    Ruffino, Paolo
    A sophisticated critical take on contemporary game culture that reconsiders the boundaries between gamers and games.This book is not about the future of video games. It is not an attempt to predict the moods of the market, the changing profile of gamers, the benevolence or malevolence of the medium. This book is about those predictions. It is about the ways in which the past, present, and future notions of games are narrated and negotiated by a small group of producers, journalists, and gamers, and about how invested these narrators are in telling the story of tomorrow.This new title from Goldsmiths...

  17. Future gaming: creative interventions in video game culture

    Ruffino, Paolo
    A sophisticated critical take on contemporary game culture that reconsiders the boundaries between gamers and games.This book is not about the future of video games. It is not an attempt to predict the moods of the market, the changing profile of gamers, the benevolence or malevolence of the medium. This book is about those predictions. It is about the ways in which the past, present, and future notions of games are narrated and negotiated by a small group of producers, journalists, and gamers, and about how invested these narrators are in telling the story of tomorrow.This new title from Goldsmiths...

  18. Levinas on ecology and nature

    Boothroyd, Dave
    Most attempts to articulate the relevance of Levinas’ philosophy to the project of rethinking nature, ecology and ‘the environment‘ in view of the perceived impending planetary crisis, focus on his key ethical concepts such as the face-to-face, transcendence, absolute alterity and Infinity. The implicit anthropocentrism of this dimension of his schema is often found to be a decisive impasse regarding the question of the ethical status of the non-human. This chapter explains why recurrent focus on the ethical relation and ‘the beyond’ should balanced by attention to his philosophy of existence; his empiricism, his analyses of individuation, immanence and Totality,...

  19. Levinas on ecology and nature

    Boothroyd, Dave
    Most attempts to articulate the relevance of Levinas’ philosophy to the project of rethinking nature, ecology and ‘the environment‘ in view of the perceived impending planetary crisis, focus on his key ethical concepts such as the face-to-face, transcendence, absolute alterity and Infinity. The implicit anthropocentrism of this dimension of his schema is often found to be a decisive impasse regarding the question of the ethical status of the non-human. This chapter explains why recurrent focus on the ethical relation and ‘the beyond’ should balanced by attention to his philosophy of existence; his empiricism, his analyses of individuation, immanence and Totality,...

  20. Cold-blooded cognition: how to get a tortoise out of its shell

    Wilkinson, Anna; Glass, Ewen
    Very little is known about the cognitive abilities of chelonia (turtles, terrapins and tortoises). They have traditionally been considered to be “sluggish and unintelligent creatures” (Yerkes 1901, p. 520) and have largely been ignored in the study of animal cognition. However, more recent research has revealed an impressive suite of cognitive abilities in this group. But how do you ask a tortoise what it knows? We will describe the approaches we have thus far taken in the study of cognition in our model species, the red-footed tortoise (Chelonoidis carbonaria) – including work on visual cognition, spatial cognition, social learning and...

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