Mostrando recursos 1 - 20 de 260

  1. Understanding student responses to gender-based violence on campus: negotiation, reinscription and resistance

    Jordan, Ana
    This chapter presents findings from the ‘Stand Together’ action research project at the University of Lincoln (UOL), one of the first bystander intervention (BI) programmes designed to challenge gender-based violence (GBV) in a UK university. The research accompanying this project investigated student attitudes to GBV and the potential of prevention education. The focus of this chapter is on two sites which emerged in student accounts as key spaces where acts of GBV occur, as well as where sexist and heteronormative gender norms are re-inscribed, negotiated and resisted - social media and the night-time economy (NTE).

  2. Understanding student responses to gender-based violence on campus: negotiation, reinscription and resistance

    Jordan, Ana; Anitha, Sundari; Jameson, Jill; Davy, Zowie
    This chapter presents findings from the ‘Stand Together’ action research project at the University of Lincoln (UOL), one of the first bystander intervention (BI) programmes designed to challenge gender-based violence (GBV) in a UK university. The research accompanying this project investigated student attitudes to GBV and the potential of prevention education. The focus of this chapter is on two sites which emerged in student accounts as key spaces where acts of GBV occur, as well as where sexist and heteronormative gender norms are re-inscribed, negotiated and resisted - social media and the night-time economy (NTE).

  3. Employee recognition schemes

    Smith, Charlotte
    Whilst few would dispute the motivational power of recognising exceptional performance in the workplace, it is unusual for texts on reward management to feature a chapter focusing solely on employee recognition schemes, separate from the related constructs of non-financial reward and total reward. There exists a sense of ambiguity around the concept of employee recognition – its meaning, constitution and role – which is reflected in the lack of scholarly research or theory development in this area, compared to other components of the reward system. This chapter is intended to extend thinking and practice around employee recognition and its management...

  4. Ghost walking

    Brewster, Scott
    The ghost walk is an abiding feature of the contemporary tourist landscape in many parts of the world, and its popularity shows no sign of diminishing. The narrative structures and pedestrian rhythms of this leisure experience are strongly indebted to the literary ghost story, and the chapter explores the ways in which the work of Henry James and M. R. James anticipate the pattern of wandering and digression encouraged by the contemporary ghost walk. Ghost walks, like ghost stories, mark the enduring appeal of a story that lingers, or of a resonant place that makes one pause.

  5. Well-being and the television actor: Challenges and coping strategies

    Hogg, Christopher; Smith, Charlotte
    This chapter explores the complex nature of health and well-being for actors working in the contemporary British television industry. Through the analysis of interviews conducted with three female actors at different stages in their television careers, the chapter seeks to identify and better understand some of the factors which impact upon their health and well-being. Moreover, the chapter considers a number of individual differences that mediate the degree to which such factors are experienced as stressful and influence the development and employment of coping strategies. In addition to identifying a number of key coping mechanisms currently employed by these television...

  6. Evidence of auditory insensitivity to vocalisation frequencies in two frogs

    Goutte, Sandra; Mason, Matthew J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Montealegre-Z, Fernando; Chivers, Benedict D.; Sarria, Fabio; Antoniazzi, Marta M.; Jared, Carlos; Almeida Sato, Luciana; Toledo, Luís Felipe
    The emergence and maintenance of animal communication systems requires the co-evolution of signal and receiver. Frogs and toads rely heavily on acoustic communication for coordinating reproduction and typically have ears tuned to the dominant frequency of their vocalizations, allowing discrimination from background noise and heterospecific calls. However, we present here evidence that two anurans, Brachycephalus ephippium and B. pitanga, are insensitive to the sound of their own calls. Both species produce advertisement calls outside their hearing sensitivity range and the inner ear is partly undeveloped, which accounts for their lack of high-frequency sensitivity. Unheard by the intended receivers, calls are...

  7. Evidence of auditory insensitivity to vocalisation frequencies in two frogs

    Goutte, Sandra; Mason, Matthew J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Montealegre-Z, Fernando; Chivers, Benedict D.; Sarria, Fabio; Antoniazzi, Marta M.; Jared, Carlos; Almeida Sato, Luciana; Toledo, Luís Felipe
    The emergence and maintenance of animal communication systems requires the co-evolution of signal and receiver. Frogs and toads rely heavily on acoustic communication for coordinating reproduction and typically have ears tuned to the dominant frequency of their vocalizations, allowing discrimination from background noise and heterospecific calls. However, we present here evidence that two anurans, Brachycephalus ephippium and B. pitanga, are insensitive to the sound of their own calls. Both species produce advertisement calls outside their hearing sensitivity range and the inner ear is partly undeveloped, which accounts for their lack of high-frequency sensitivity. Unheard by the intended receivers, calls are...

  8. The organization as negotiator

    Borbély, Adrian; Caputo, Andrea
    The authors discuss the surprising shortage of research on how organizations negotiate or plan to negotiate, when the work is considered on a broader than individual level. They contrast this with evidence that certain organizations have profited enormously, and even become dominant players in their markets, largely by adopting and enforcing one consistent style and approach to negotiation, one which supports in every detail the organization’s overall strategy. They argue that building on this evidence represents a potentially huge strategic opportunity for organizations which have not yet tackled consistency of purpose and of execution across all of their relationships with suppliers, employees and other stakeholders. They note, however, that the results...

  9. Trail Smelter (United States of America / Canada) (1938 and 1941)

    French, Duncan
    The Trail Smelter Arbitration (United States/Canada) would undoubtedly be characterised as a landmark case, particularly if the principal criterion for such status is subsequent repetition leading to widespread and near-universal endorsement. As a pivotal — and indeed foundational — moment in the development of international environmental law, Trail Smelter (as it is invariably reduced to in metonymic form to represent cumulatively the facts, the judgment and, most prominently, the international legal principle enunciated therein) has received significant attention, if not something approaching legal veneration. No discussion of the history, formulation or gradual hardening of this particular area of international law would...

  10. Semantic-assisted 3D Normal Distributions Transform for scan registration in environments with limited structure

    Zaganidis, Anestis; Magnusson, Martin; Duckett, Tom; Cielniak, Grzegorz
    Point cloud registration is a core problem of many robotic applications, including simultaneous localization and mapping. The Normal Distributions Transform (NDT) is a method that fits a number of Gaussian distributions to the data points, and then uses this transform as an approximation of the real data, registering a relatively small number of distributions as opposed to the full point cloud. This approach contributes to NDT’s registration robustness and speed but leaves room for improvement in environments of limited structure. To address this limitation we propose a method for the introduction of semantic information extracted from the point clouds into...

  11. Martin Lister and his remarkable daughters: art and science in the seventeenth century

    Roos, Anna Marie
    On 17 July 1681, the English naturalist and physician Martin Lister (1639-1712) wrote to his wife Hannah en route from York to France. The good doctor suffered from severe and chronic asthma throughout his life, and he took “the waters” on the Continent periodically to convalesce and rest away from a busy medical practice and growing family responsibilities. Lister was also a fervent Francophile, having studied medicine in Montpellier in the 1660s, and he would go on to write a bestselling travel guide to Paris telling his readers which curiosities to see, which wine to drink, and making perceptive comments...

  12. Research methods in sport (2nd Edition)

    Smith, Mark F.
    This book is a comprehensive resource for all those studying sport and exercise science at university. It covers qualitative and quantitative methods, and explains what research is, how to conduct a systematic review, and how to select, apply and combine research methods.The reader is supported throughout by learning activities, real-life examples and advice on further study.

  13. Physical activity across the life-course: socio-cultural approaches, in . London: Palgrave Macmillan

    Evans, Adam; Nistrup, Anne; Allen-Collinson, Jacquelyn
    The subjective, lived elements of old age in physical activity promotion are central in defining how older people ascribe meaning to experiences of being active. Many such meanings are developed throughout the life course. From a longitudinal perspective, although continuity theory can be helpful in understanding older people’s sense of self and personal change, its focus on the individual can underplay the substantive influence of socio-cultural factors on the way age and ageing are understood. Using a figurational sociological framework, we illustrate how older peoples’ sense of self can be interdependent with how others define them, and how they define...

  14. Visual biases in estimating body size

    Tovee, Martin; Cornelissen, P. L.
    Western populations have been getting progressively heavier and the prevalence of obesity in the general population has become a major public health problem. A potential contributory factor in the rise of obesity is the inability to accurately detect weight increase using visual cues. This is a problem not only for members of the public whose weight is increasing, but also for health care professionals who need to detect weight gain in their patients. Three main visual biases effect body judgements; contraction bias, adaptation and Weber’s law. Contraction bias (a result of how we estimate body size) leads to people over-estimating...

  15. An explorative investigation into the warm-up practices of both professional and amateur rugby league players

    Gee, Thomas; Morrow, Ryan; Dorrell, Harry; Bishop, Daniel
    PURPOSE: Rugby League (RL) players require high levels of speed, strength, power, agility and psychological readiness. Optimum preparation for performance via warm-up (WU) routines has been an area of research speculation in recent years. This study aimed to survey the WU protocols of professional and amateur RL players, to determine player’s perceptions of their featured WU procedures and to establish any significant differences in WU practices and perceptions between the two populations. METHODS: An online questionnaire was used to investigate 30 professional and 53 amateur players’ WU protocols and their perceptions behind their practices, providing both statistical and descriptive analysis....

  16. Intersectionality before the courts: the face veil cases

    Ali, Amal
    In 2014 the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) upheld the French Constitutional Court’s decision that a ban on the Islamic face veil, could still be justified by reference to, amongst other legitimate aims, the legitimate aim of living together. While many celebrated that the Court no longer accepts the gender equality as one of the justifications for limiting the right to wear the Islamic face veil, others were disappointed to find that the judgment continues to run counter to the ECtHR’s equality jurisprudence and continues to perpetuate islamophobia. This paper considers the representation of veiled women, their right to manifest...

  17. Victims of crime: constructions, governance and policy

    Hall, Matthew
    In the early 21st century criminal victimisation is everywhere. From high-definition videos of the latest terrorist atrocities beamed into our homes, our phones and our laptops by 24-hour news networks (BBC, 2017) to the bite-size, personal, accounts from victims of crime, their families and their supporters appearing on our social media feeds. Under such conditions, members of the public can feel more personally connected with such instances of victimisation than at any time in recent history. Whether it be the collective outrage felt when terrorists strike at the ‘heart of our democracy’ (ITV, 2017) or a deep sense of personal...

  18. Mind the gap: Methodology discussion of the extraction and analysis of pilot phase data to generate multi-configuration household behavioural profiles

    Aly, Abdelrahman; Elnokaly, Amira; Mills, Glen
    This paper constitutes the conclusion of a three-month pilot study, concluding March 2017, performed in a CfSH level 5 housing projects in Lincolnshire, UK. The study uses purpose designed activity and occupancy logs, climate tracking and monitoring of interior environment through the use of data loggers. The research’s final output uses occupancy tracking by introducing self-observation and its translation to energy consumption by its integration into multiple occupancy calculation methodologies to investigate these results within the post-pilot study phase. The pilot study constitutes the development of these methods according to each house’s occupants and the research objectives. The study aims at generating multi-configuration household behavioural profiles through...

  19. Understanding patterns of action: using behaviour sequence analysis in crime research

    Keatley, David
    The main scope of this book is to present Behaviour Sequence Analysis (BSA) in a user-friendly, applied way, for both academics and practitioners in the field of crime and forensic psychology. BSA is a method for understanding patterns across people’s life histories (e.g., the development of criminal behaviours from birth to adulthood) or particular episodes (e.g., criminal activities, crime scene behaviours). The method is versatile and provides clear outputs of most likely chains of behaviours and events, which practitioners can use to understand the sequence of behaviours.

  20. Victims of crime: constructions governance and policy

    Hall, Matthew
    This volume critically engages with the development of official policy and reform in relation to the support of victims of crime both within and beyond the criminal justice system of England and Wales. Since the election of the Conservative/Liberal Democrat Coalition Government in May 2010 it is argued that victimization has increasingly taken on a greater cultural resonance both in England and Wales and in other industrialised countries. Images of terrorism, public debates around the handling of sexual victimisation by the courts, and the issue of child sexual exploitation have catapulted victim issues into the public consciousness like never before...

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