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Datasets of project "European network of excellence for Ocean Ecosystems Analysis"

Mostrando recursos 1 - 20 de 290

  1. Data compilation of ciliates growth rate, grazing rate and gross gowth efficiency from field and labratory experiments

    Sailley, Sevrine; Klaas, Christine
    The present data compilation includes ciliates growth rate, grazing rate and gross growth efficiency determined either in the field or in laboratory experiments. From the existing literature, we synthesized all data that we could find on cilliate. Some sources might be missing but none were purposefully ignored. Field data on microzooplankton grazing are mostly comprised of grazing rate using the dilution technique with a 24h incubation period. Laboratory grazing and growth data are focused on pelagic ciliates and heterotrophic dinoflagellates. The experiment measured grazing or growth as a function of prey concentration or at saturating prey concentration (maximal grazing rate)....

  2. Data compilation of dinoflagellates growth rate, grazing rate and gross gowth efficiency from field and labratory experiments

    Sailley, Sevrine; Klaas, Christine
    The present data compilation includes dinoflagellates growth rate, grazing rate and gross growth efficiency determined either in the field or in laboratory experiments. From the existing literature, we synthesized all data that we could find on dinoflagellates. Some sources might be missing but none were purposefully ignored. We did not include autotrophic dinoflagellates in the database, but mixotrophic organisms may have been included. This is due to the large uncertainty about which taxa are mixotrophic, heterotrophic or symbiont bearing. Field data on microzooplankton grazing are mostly comprised of grazing rate using the dilution technique with a 24h incubation period. Laboratory...

  3. Seawater carbonate chemistry in Hog reef and calcification rate in the Bermuda reef community, 2010

    Bates, Nicolas R; Amat, A; Andersson, Andreas J
    Despite the potential impact of ocean acidification on ecosystems such as coral reefs, surprisingly, there is very limited field data on the relationships between calcification and seawater carbonate chemistry. In this study, contemporaneous in situ datasets of seawater carbonate chemistry and calcification rates from the high-latitude coral reef of Bermuda over annual timescales provide a framework for investigating the present and future potential impact of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) levels and ocean acidification on coral reef ecosystems in their natural environment. A strong correlation was found between the in situ rates of calcification for the major framework building coral species...

  4. Seawater carbonate chemistry and biological processes during experiments with phytoplankton Emiliania huxleyi (CS369), 2009

    Gao, Kunshan; Ruan, Zuoxi; Villafañe, Virginia E; Helbling, E Walter; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre
    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration affects calcification in most planktonic calcifiers. Both reduced or stimulated calcification under high CO2 have been reported in the widespread coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. This might affect the response of cells to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm) and ultraviolet radiation (UVR; 280-400 nm) by altering the thickness of the coccolith layer. Here we show that in the absence of UVR, the calcification rates in E. huxleyi decrease under lowered pH levels (pHNBS of 7.9 and 7.6; pCO2 of 81 and 178 Pa or 804 and 1759 ppmv, respectively) leading to thinned coccolith layers, whereas photosynthetic carbon...

  5. Seawater carbonate chemistry and calcification during experiments with corals, 2003

    Marubini, Francesca; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Cuif, Jean-Pierre
    Biogenic calcification is influenced by the concentration of available carbonate ions. The recent confirmation of this for hermatypic corals has raised concern over the future of coral reefs because [CO3] is a decreasing function of increasing pCO2 in the atmosphere. As one of the overriding features of coral reefs is their diversity, understanding the degree of variability between species in their ability to cope with a change in [CO3] is a priority. We cultured four phylogenetically and physiologically different species of hermatypic coral (Acropora verweyi, Galaxea fascicularis, Pavona cactus and Turbinaria reniformis) under 'normal' (280 µmol/kg) and 'low' (140 µmol/kg)...

  6. Seawater carbonate chemistry and encrusting algal communities during a mesocosm experiment, 2007

    Kuffner, Ilsa B; Andersson, Andreas J; Jokiel, Paul L; Rodgers, Kuulei S; Mackenzie, Fred T
    Owing to anthropogenic emissions, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide could almost double between 2006 and 2100 according to business-as-usual carbon dioxide emission scenarios. Because the ocean absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations will lead to increasing dissolved inorganic carbon and carbon dioxide in surface ocean waters, and hence acidification and lower carbonate saturation states. As a consequence, it has been suggested that marine calcifying organisms, for example corals, coralline algae, molluscs and foraminifera, will have difficulties producing their skeletons and shells at current rates, with potentially severe implications for marine ecosystems, including coral reefs. Here...

  7. Seawater carbonate chemistry, cell numbers and growth rate during experiments with dinoflagellates, 2007

    Hansen, Per Juel; Lundholm, Nina; Rost, Bjoern
    The effects of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) on the growth of 3 red-tide dinoflagellates (Ceratium lineatum, Heterocapsa triquetra and Prorocentrum minimum) were studied at pH 8.0 and at higher pH levels, depending upon the pH tolerance of the individual species. The higher pH levels chosen for experiments were 8.55 for C. lineatum and 9.2 for the other 2 species. At pH 8.0, which approximates the pH found in the open sea, the maximum growth in all species was maintained until the total DIC concentration was reduced below ~0.4 and 0.2 mM for C. lineatum and the other 2 species, respectively....

  8. Seawater carbonate chemistry and pteropod Limacina helicina antarctica shell dissolution during experiments, 2012

    Bednarsek, Nina; Tarling, Geraint A; Bakker, Dorothee C E; Fielding, Sophie; Cohen, Anne L; Kuzirian, Alan; McCorkle, Daniel C; Lézé, Bertrand; Montagna, Roberto
    Anthropogenic ocean acidification is likely to have negative effects on marine calcifying organisms, such as shelled pteropods, by promoting dissolution of aragonite shells. Study of shell dissolution requires an accurate and sensitive method for assessing shell damage. Shell dissolution was induced through incubations in CO2 enriched seawater for between 4 and 14 days. We describe a procedure that allows the level of dissolution to be assessed and classified into three main types: Type I with partial dissolution of the prismatic layer; Type II with exposure of underlying crossed-lamellar layer, and Type III, where crossed-lamellar layer shows signs of dissolution. Levels...

  9. Seawater carbonate chemistry and brown dottyback (Pseudochromis fuscus) movement and feeding behaviour during experiments, 2011

    Cripps, Ingrid L; Munday, Philip L; McCormick, Mark I
    Changes in olfactory-mediated behaviour caused by elevated CO2 levels in the ocean could affect recruitment to reef fish populations because larval fish become more vulnerable to predation. However, it is currently unclear how elevated CO2 will impact the other key part of the predator-prey interaction - the predators. We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 and reduced pH on olfactory preferences, activity levels and feeding behaviour of a common coral reef meso-predator, the brown dottyback (Pseudochromis fuscus). Predators were exposed to either current-day CO2 levels or one of two elevated CO2 levels (~600 µatm or ~950 µatm) that may occur...

  10. Seawater carbonate chemistry and expression of hsp70, hsp90 and hsf1 in the reef coral Acropora digitifera during experiments, 2012

    Nakamura, Masoko; Morita, Masaya; Kurihara, Haruko; Mitarai, Satoshi
    Ocean acidification is an ongoing threat for marine organisms due to the increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. Seawater acidification has a serious impact on physiologic processes in marine organisms at all life stages. On the other hand, potential tolerance to external pH changes has been reported in coral larvae. Information about the possible mechanisms underlying such tolerance responses, however, is scarce. In the present study, we examined the effects of acidified seawater on the larvae of Acropora digitifera at the molecular level. We targeted two heat shock proteins, Hsp70 and Hsp90, and a heat shock transcription factor, Hsf1, because of their...

  11. Species-specific consequences of ocean acidification for the calcareous tropical green algae Halimeda, 2011

    Price, Nichole N; Hamilton, Scott L; Smith, Jennifer E; Tootell, Jesse S
    Ocean acidification (OA), resulting from increasing dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) in surface waters, is likely to affect many marine organisms, particularly those that calcify. Recent OA studies have demonstrated negative and/or differential effects of reduced pH on growth, development, calcification and physiology, but most of these have focused on taxa other than calcareous benthic macroalgae. Here we investigate the potential effects of OA on one of the most common coral reef macroalgal genera,Halimeda. Species of Halimeda produce a large proportion of the sand in the tropics and are a major contributor to framework development on reefs because of their rapid...

  12. Seawater carbonate chemistry and calcification, mass and shed rate of tropical green algae species Halimeda, 2011

    Price, Nichole N; Hamilton, Scott L; Tootell, Jesse S; Smith, Jennifer E

  13. Seawater carbonate chemistry near Palmyra Atoll located in the Northern Line Island chain in the Central Pacific, 2011

    Price, Nichole N; Hamilton, Scott L; Tootell, Jesse S; Smith, Jennifer E

  14. Interacting effects of CO2 partial pressure and temperature on photosynthesis and calcification in a scleractinian coral, 2003

    Reynaud, Stéphanie; Leclercq, Nicolas; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Romaine-Lioud, Samantha; Jaubert, Jean; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre
    We show here that CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) and temperature significantly interact on coral physiology. The effects of increased pCO2 and temperature on photosynthesis, respiration and calcification rates were investigated in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Cuttings were exposed to temperatures of 25°C or 28°C and to pCO2 values of ca. 460 or 760 muatm for 5 weeks. The contents of chlorophyll c2 and protein remained constant throughout the experiment, while the chlorophyll a content was significantly affected by temperature, and was higher under the 'high-temperature-high-pCO2' condition. The cell-specific density was higher at 'high pCO2' than at 'normal pCO2' (1.7...

  15. Seawater carbonate chemistry and calcification rate during experiments with coral Stylophora pistillata, 2003

    Reynaud, Stéphanie; Leclercq, Nicolas; Romaine-Lioud, Samantha; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Jaubert, Jean; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre
    We show here that CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) and temperature significantly interact on coral physiology. The effects of increased pCO2 and temperature on photosynthesis, respiration and calcification rates were investigated in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Cuttings were exposed to temperatures of 25°C or 28°C and to pCO2 values of ca. 460 or 760 muatm for 5 weeks. The contents of chlorophyll c2 and protein remained constant throughout the experiment, while the chlorophyll a content was significantly affected by temperature, and was higher under the 'high-temperature-high-pCO2' condition. The cell-specific density was higher at 'high pCO2' than at 'normal pCO2' (1.7...

  16. Seawater carbonate chemistry and resource allocation and extracellular acid-base status in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis during experiments, 2012

    Stumpp, Meike; Trübenbach, Katja; Brennecke, Dennis; Hu, Marian Y; Melzner, Frank
    Anthropogenic CO2 emission will lead to an increase in seawater pCO2 of up to 80-100 Pa (800-1000 µatm) within this century and to an acidification of the oceans. Green sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) occurring in Kattegat experience seasonal hypercapnic and hypoxic conditions already today. Thus, anthropogenic CO2 emissions will add up to existing values and will lead to even higher pCO2 values >200 Pa (>2000 µatm). To estimate the green sea urchins' potential to acclimate to acidified seawater, we calculated an energy budget and determined the extracellular acid base status of adult S. droebachiensis exposed to moderately (102 to 145...

  17. Ocean acidification and its potential effects on the early life-history of non-calcifying and calcifying echinoderm (Odontaster validus, Patiriella regularis and Arachnoides placenta) larvae, 2011

    Gonzalez Bernat, Maria Jose
    Ocean acidification, as a result of increased atmospheric CO2, has the potential to adversely affect the larval stages of many marine organisms and hence have profound effects on marine ecosystems. This is the first study of its kind to investigate the effects of ocean acidification on the early life-history stages of three echinoderms species, two asteroids and one irregular echinoid. Potential latitudinal variations on the effects of ocean acidification were also investigated by selecting a polar species (Odontaster validus), a temperate species (Patiriella regularis), and a tropical species (Arachnoides placenta). The effects of reduced seawater pH levels on the fertilization...

  18. Seawater carbonate chemistry echinoderm (Odontaster validus, Patiriella regularis and Arachnoides placenta) size during experiments, 2011

    Gonzalez Bernat, Maria Jose

  19. Seawater carbonate chemistry echinoderm (Odontaster validus, Patiriella regularis and Arachnoides placenta) survival during experiments, 2011

    Gonzalez Bernat, Maria Jose

  20. Seawater carbonate chemistry echinoderm (Odontaster validus, Patiriella regularis and Arachnoides placenta) survival during experiments, 2011

    Gonzalez Bernat, Maria Jose

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