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UCL University College London Eprints (352,821 recursos)
UCL Eprints collects the work of UCL researchers and makes it freely available over the web, helping the worldwide scholarly community to discover UCL research. Institutional repositories like UCL Eprints complement the traditional academic publishing and scholarly communications processes. They raise the visibility of research and help to maximise its impact. UCL researchers are encouraged to deposit a copy of each journal article, conference paper, working paper, and any other research output, in the UCL Eprints at the earliest opportunity, ensuring that their research reaches as wide an audience as possible.

Mostrando recursos 61 - 80 de 352,441

61. Using yeast as a model to study membrane proteins. - Petschnigg, J; Moe, OW; Stagljar, I
Many cellular processes are controlled via either stable or transient protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Protein complexes are 'molecular machines' in which multiple interactive partners carry out various cellular functions. Given that almost a third of the proteome consists of membrane proteins and that more than 50% of currently available drugs are targeted toward them, investigation of membrane protein complexes has taken center stage over the past years. Thus, gaining an in-depth understanding of PPI networks will give us more insight into the functional relationship as well as downstream effectors of protein complexes, hence opening strategies for new drug target definitions.

62. Investigation of membrane protein interactions using the split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid system. - Petschnigg, J; Wong, V; Snider, J; Stagljar, I
Proteins are generally organized into molecular complexes, in which multiple interaction partners collaborate to carry out cellular processes. Thus, techniques to map protein-protein interactions have become pivotal for biological studies of as yet uncharacterized proteins. Investigation of interaction partners of membrane proteins is of special interest, as they play a major role in cellular processes and are often directly linked to human diseases. Owing to their hydrophobic nature, however, it has proven difficult to study their interaction partners. To circumvent this problem, a yeast-based genetic technology for the in vivo detection of membrane protein interactions, the split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid...

63. CHIP-MYTH: a novel interactive proteomics method for the assessment of agonist-dependent interactions of the human β₂-adrenergic receptor. - Kittanakom, S; Barrios-Rodiles, M; Petschnigg, J; Arnoldo, A; Wong, V; Kotlyar, M; Heisler, LE; Jurisica, I; Wrana, JL; Nislow, C; Stagljar, I
G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in a variety of disease processes and comprise major drug targets. However, the complexity of integral membrane proteins such as GPCRs makes the identification of their interacting partners and subsequent drug development challenging. A comprehensive understanding of GPCR protein interaction networks is needed to design effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit these drug targets. Here, we developed a novel split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid (MYTH) technology called CHIP-MYTH, which allows the unbiased characterization of interaction partners of full-length GPCRs in a drug-dependent manner. This was achieved by coupling DNA microarray technology to the MYTH approach, which...

64. The mammalian-membrane two-hybrid assay (MaMTH) for probing membrane-protein interactions in human cells. - Petschnigg, J; Groisman, B; Kotlyar, M; Taipale, M; Zheng, Y; Kurat, CF; Sayad, A; Sierra, JR; Mattiazzi Usaj, M; Snider, J; Nachman, A; Krykbaeva, I; Tsao, MS; Moffat, J; Pawson, T; Lindquist, S; Jurisica, I; Stagljar, I
Cell signaling, one of key processes in both normal cellular function and disease, is coordinated by numerous interactions between membrane proteins that change in response to stimuli. We present a split ubiquitin-based method for detection of integral membrane protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in human cells, termed mammalian-membrane two-hybrid assay (MaMTH). We show that this technology detects stimulus (hormone or agonist)-dependent and phosphorylation-dependent PPIs. MaMTH can detect changes in PPIs conferred by mutations such as those in oncogenic ErbB receptor variants or by treatment with drugs such as the tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. Using MaMTH as a screening assay, we identified CRKII...

65. Cell cycle-regulated oscillator coordinates core histone gene transcription through histone acetylation. - Kurat, CF; Lambert, JP; Petschnigg, J; Friesen, H; Pawson, T; Rosebrock, A; Gingras, AC; Fillingham, J; Andrews, B
DNA replication occurs during the synthetic (S) phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle and features a dramatic induction of histone gene expression for concomitant chromatin assembly. Ectopic production of core histones outside of S phase is toxic, underscoring the critical importance of regulatory pathways that ensure proper expression of histone genes. Several regulators of histone gene expression in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are known, yet the key oscillator responsible for restricting gene expression to S phase has remained elusive. Here, we show that suppressor of Ty (Spt)10, a putative histone acetyltransferase, and its binding partner Spt21 are key determinants...

66. In silico prediction of physical protein interactions and characterization of interactome orphans. - Kotlyar, M; Pastrello, C; Pivetta, F; Lo Sardo, A; Cumbaa, C; Li, H; Naranian, T; Niu, Y; Ding, Z; Vafaee, F; Broackes-Carter, F; Petschnigg, J; Mills, GB; Jurisicova, A; Stagljar, I; Maestro, R; Jurisica, I
Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are useful for understanding signaling cascades, predicting protein function, associating proteins with disease and fathoming drug mechanism of action. Currently, only ∼ 10% of human PPIs may be known, and about one-third of human proteins have no known interactions. We introduce FpClass, a data mining-based method for proteome-wide PPI prediction. At an estimated false discovery rate of 60%, we predicted 250,498 PPIs among 10,531 human proteins; 10,647 PPIs involved 1,089 proteins without known interactions. We experimentally tested 233 high- and medium-confidence predictions and validated 137 interactions, including seven novel putative interactors of the tumor suppressor p53. Compared...

67. Associations between fibrin D-dimer, markers of inflammation, incident self-reported mobility limitation, and all-cause mortality in older men. - Wannamethee, SG; Whincup, PH; Lennon, L; Papacosta, O; Lowe, GD
To examine the independent relationships between fibrin D-dimer, interleukin 6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen and incident mobility limitation and mortality.

68. CARDIOMETABOLIC AND SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF FRAILTY: RESULTS FROM A POPULATION-BASED STUDY OF ELDERLY BRITISH MEN - Ramsay, SE; Arianayagam, DS; Papacosta, O; Lennon, LT; Wannamethee, SG

69. Elevated parathyroid hormone, but not vitamin D deficiency, is associated with increased risk of heart failure in older men with and without cardiovascular disease. - Wannamethee, SG; Welsh, P; Papacosta, O; Lennon, L; Whincup, PH; Sattar, N
Hyperparathyroidism and low vitamin D status have been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF). We examined the prospective associations between parathyroid hormone (PTH), circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and markers of mineral metabolism and risk of incident HF in older men with and without established cardiovascular disease.

70. Adiposity in early, middle and later adult life and cardiometabolic risk markers in later life; findings from the British regional heart study. - Kapetanakis, VV; Rudnicka, AR; Wathern, AK; Lennon, L; Papacosta, O; Cook, DG; Wannamethee, SG; Whincup, PH; Owen, CG
This research investigates the associations between body mass index (BMI) at 21, 40-59, 60-79 years of age on cardiometabolic risk markers at 60-79 years.

71. Multi-centre variability of ISCEV standard ERGs in two normal adults - Hamilton, R; Keating, D; Al Abdlseaed, A; Healey, J; Brown, L; Neveu, MM; McBain, VA; Sculfor, D; Thompson, DA
Conclusions: Inter-centre amplitude variability was typically within clinically significant thresholds, suggesting that inter-centre variability with suitable standardisation may not add more to total variability than inter-subject variability. Variability improvements gained by the tighter specifications of the ISCEV-specified protocol were possibly more than lost due to imprecisions of xenon flashtubes. Peak time variability was far lower than amplitude variability, corresponding with acceptable variability of biochemical assays. These results represent a vindication of the existence of an ERG standard and suggest that further standardisation would lend itself to greater reproducibility of ERGs worldwide.

72. Variability of flashes and background luminances of clinical electroretinography stimuli across 14 UK centres - Hamilton, R; Keating, D; Al Abdlseaed, A; Healey, J; Brown, L; Neveu, MM; Mcbain, VA; Sculfor, D; Thompson, DA
Three different flash strengths (dim, 0.01 cd s m; strong, 3 cd s m; strongest, 10 or 30 cd s m) and one adapting field luminance (30 cd m) are used for clinical electroretinograms (ERGs). To quantify their variability for local, LED-flash protocols, and for an ISCEV-specified, xenon-flash protocol, photometric measurements were made at 14 ERG centres across the UK. For local protocols, flashes were within a median of 0.01 log units of nominal, target levels and six, nine, eight and eight of 14 centres were within ISCEV tolerance (±0.05 log units) for dim, strong, strongest flashes and backgrounds, respectively....

73. Multi-centre variability of ISCEV standard ERGs in two normal adults - Hamilton, R; Keating, D; Al Abdlseaed, A; Healey, J; Brown, L; Neveu, MM; McBain, VA; Sculfor, D; Thompson, DA
Results: Inter-ocular differences were small, and amplitudes were smaller for skin than silver thread electrodes. No centre produced outlying data points, and ERGs across all 15 centres were remarkably similar. Amplitude variability was less for local protocols (using LED flashes) than for the ISCEV-specified protocol using xenon flashes (22 vs. 24 %, p = 0.01), but peak time variability was less for the ISCEV-specified protocol (6.1 vs. 7.4 %, p = 0.001). Only the DA 0.01 ERG correlated with photometric variability. The bifidity of the DA 3 a-wave doubled its peak time variability compared with the DA 10 a-wave.

74. Variability of flashes and background luminances of clinical electroretinography stimuli across 14 UK centres - Hamilton, R; Keating, D; Al Abdlseaed, A; Healey, J; Brown, L; Neveu, MM; McBain, VA; Sculfor, D; Thompson, DA
Three different flash strengths (dim, 0.01 cd s m; strong, 3 cd s m; strongest, 10 or 30 cd s m) and one adapting field luminance (30 cd m) are used for clinical electroretinograms (ERGs). To quantify their variability for local, LED-flash protocols, and for an ISCEV-specified, xenon-flash protocol, photometric measurements were made at 14 ERG centres across the UK. For local protocols, flashes were within a median of 0.01 log units of nominal, target levels and six, nine, eight and eight of 14 centres were within ISCEV tolerance (±0.05 log units) for dim, strong, strongest flashes and backgrounds, respectively....

75. A semi-automated genome annotation comparison and integration scheme - Liu, Z; Ma, H; Goryanin, I

76. Firing of Hippocampal Neurogliaform Cells Induces Suppression of Synaptic Inhibition - Li, G; Stewart, R; Canepari, M; Capogna, M

77. Sustainability and the co-constitution of substances and subjects - Wilkes, SE
This chapter examines the role that materials play in mediating the constitution of moral persons. It draws on ethnographic research among the materials scientists, engineers and designers that make up membership of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM 3 ), a professional body representing the UK materials industry (Wilkes 2013). Rather than focusing on any one material, this research takes a horizontal view across myriad materials to explore the ways in which materials as diverse as PVC, concrete, carbon fi bre, paper and steel jostle for market share and are dynamically and differentially categorized as sustainable or unsustainable....

78. Quantum Monte Carlo Treatment of the Charge Transfer and Diradical Electronic Character in a Retinal Chromophore Minimal Model - Zen, A; Coccia, E; Gozem, S; Olivucci, M; Guidoni, L

79. Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water by Quantum Monte Carlo - Zen, A; Luo, Y; Mazzola, G; Guidoni, L; Sorella, S
Despite liquid water is ubiquitous in chemical reactions at roots of life and climate on earth, the prediction of its properties by high-level ab initio molecular dynamics simulations still represents a formidable task for quantum chemistry. In this article we present a room temperature simulation of liquid water based on the potential energy surface obtained by a many-body wave function through quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. The simulated properties are in excellent agreement with recent neutron scattering and X-ray experiments, particularly concerning the position of the oxygen-oxygen peak in the radial distribution function, at variance of previous Density Functional Theory...

80. Static and dynamical correlation in diradical molecules by Quantum Monte Carlo using the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power ansatz - Zen, A; Coccia, E; Luo, Y; Sorella, S; Guidoni, L
Diradical molecules are essential species involved in many organic and inorganic chemical reactions. The computational study of their electronic structure is often challenging, because a reliable description of the correlation, and in particular of the static one, requires multi-reference techniques. The Jastrow correlated Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) is a compact and efficient wave function ansatz, based on the valence-bond representation, which can be used within Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approaches. The AGP part can be rewritten in terms of molecular orbitals, obtaining a multi-determinant expansion with zero-seniority number. In the present work we demonstrate the capability of the JAGP ansatz...

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