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The KnowledgeBank at OSU (79.989 recursos)

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Empirical Musicology Review: Volume 2, Number 2 (2007)

Mostrando recursos 1 - 6 de 6

  1. Announcements

    Butler, David
    Announcements: Calls for Papers and Conferences

  2. Review: David Huron, "Sweet Anticipation: Music and the Psychology of Expectation"

    Thompson, William Forde
    review of David Huron's "Sweet Anticipation: Music and the Psychology of Expectation". Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2006. ISBN-10: 0-262-08345-0; ISBN-13: 978-0-262-08345-4 (hardcover) $40.00

  3. David Huron, Sweet Anticipation: Music and the Psychology of Expectation

    Aiello, Rita
    review of David Huron's "Sweet Anticipation: Music and the Psychology of Expectation". Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2006. ISBN-10: 0-262-08345-0; ISBN-13: 978-0-262-08345-4 (hardcover) $40.00

  4. A Response to Andrea R. Halpern's Commentary

    Bailes, Freya
    The author responds to points raised in Andrea Halpern’s commentary, which appeared in Vol. 2, No. 1 of Empirical Musicology Review. Discussion focuses on the apparent contradiction between self-reports of veridical mental imagery of musical timbre, and cognitive constraints on temporal memory for multidimensional sound.

  5. Commentary on Daniel Perttu's "A Quantitative Study of Chromaticism"

    Samplaski, Art
    The methodology used in Daniel Perttu’s article is analyzed for conformance to several criteria needed in quantitative studies. A number of problems are identified. Some of these appear to be deep structural issues given the nature of the question studied while others are caused by the methodology itself, by both the types of analyses carried out and the nature of the data source. Various suggestions to strengthen the study are made.

  6. A Quantitative Study of Chromaticism: Changes Observed in Historical Eras and Individual Composers

    Perttu, Daniel
    Music historians have observed informally that Western music became increasingly chromatic between roughly 1600 and 1900. This view is tested formally, and the results are shown to be consistent with the standard view. Music historians have similarly assumed that the music of major composers such as Mozart and Beethoven became increasingly chromatic over their respective lifetimes. Measurements of chromaticism in both theme-based and opus-based samples are shown to be inconsistent with these intuitions. At face value, the results of this study affirm that Western art music has become more chromatic over time, but that five major composers' use of chromatic tones changed little (quantitatively) over the course of their...

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