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Working Papers in Linguistics: Volume 38 (July 1990)

Mostrando recursos 1 - 18 de 18

  1. Front Matter (Volume 38, July 1990)


  2. Front Matter (Volume 38, July 1990)


  3. The Accentual Pattern and Prosody of the Chonnam Dialect of Korean

    Jun, Sun-Ah
    This paper examines the pitch accent properties of the South Cholla (Chonnam) dialect. The Chonnam dialect has two kinds of accentual patterns, Low-High-Low and High-High-Low, which are determined by the properties of the first segment of a phrase. The domain of the accentual pattern is a Phonological phrase in the prosodic hierarchy postulated in Selkirk (1980, 1984) and Nespor and Vogel (1982, 1986), assuming a phonological word is the same as a morphological word, a lexical word plus any postnominal particles and inflectional endings. Basically each phonological word can form one accentual phrase. However, more than one phonological word can...

  4. The Accentual Pattern and Prosody of the Chonnam Dialect of Korean

    Jun, Sun-Ah
    This paper examines the pitch accent properties of the South Cholla (Chonnam) dialect. The Chonnam dialect has two kinds of accentual patterns, Low-High-Low and High-High-Low, which are determined by the properties of the first segment of a phrase. The domain of the accentual pattern is a Phonological phrase in the prosodic hierarchy postulated in Selkirk (1980, 1984) and Nespor and Vogel (1982, 1986), assuming a phonological word is the same as a morphological word, a lexical word plus any postnominal particles and inflectional endings. Basically each phonological word can form one accentual phrase. However, more than one phonological word can...

  5. Korean Lenis and Fortis Stops: Synthesis and Categorical Speech Perception Task

    Lee, Sook-hyang
    This paper reports on an attempt to synthesize two different Korean syllables based on the previous articulatory and acoustic studies about Korean stops: /t'a/ which consists of an alveolar fortis stop and /ta/ which consists of an alveolar lenis stop. Using these two synthesized syllables as endpoints of the continuum, five more syllables between two endpoints were created for identification and discrimination tasks. Korean native speakers did not perceive the stimuli categorically; their identification boundary was not very sharp and the discrimination peak was not very high, either. Two possible reasons were proposed for this unexpected result.

  6. Korean Lenis and Fortis Stops: Synthesis and Categorical Speech Perception Task

    Lee, Sook-hyang
    This paper reports on an attempt to synthesize two different Korean syllables based on the previous articulatory and acoustic studies about Korean stops: /t'a/ which consists of an alveolar fortis stop and /ta/ which consists of an alveolar lenis stop. Using these two synthesized syllables as endpoints of the continuum, five more syllables between two endpoints were created for identification and discrimination tasks. Korean native speakers did not perceive the stimuli categorically; their identification boundary was not very sharp and the discrimination peak was not very high, either. Two possible reasons were proposed for this unexpected result.

  7. VCV Coarticulation in Arabic

    Hussein, Lutfi
    Vowel-to-vowel coarticulation in VCV utterances has been the subject of several studies. Öhman (1966) found that vowels in VCV utterances in English and Swedish have trans-consonantal effects on one another. He also found some evidence suggesting that secondary articulation features like palatalization in Russian block coarticulation. Action theorists, such as Fowler (1983), explain V-to-V coarticulation in terms of universal principles of speech timing; that is, they claim that vowels in speech production are underlyingly overlapping and consonants ride on top of the vowels. This suggestion implies that intervocalic consonants, regardless of whether they have secondary articulation features, do not block...

  8. VCV Coarticulation in Arabic

    Hussein, Lutfi
    Vowel-to-vowel coarticulation in VCV utterances has been the subject of several studies. Öhman (1966) found that vowels in VCV utterances in English and Swedish have trans-consonantal effects on one another. He also found some evidence suggesting that secondary articulation features like palatalization in Russian block coarticulation. Action theorists, such as Fowler (1983), explain V-to-V coarticulation in terms of universal principles of speech timing; that is, they claim that vowels in speech production are underlyingly overlapping and consonants ride on top of the vowels. This suggestion implies that intervocalic consonants, regardless of whether they have secondary articulation features, do not block...

  9. lnterarticulator Timing and Single-Articulator Velocity-Displacement in English Stress Pairs

    deJong, Kenneth
    Models of speech production utilize mentalist accounts of speech phenomena to varying degrees. Especially noted in this paper are accounts of the timing of speech which have sought to eliminate altogether the temporal dimension from mental control. Two major parts of the theory--that in Harris et al. (1986), and that in Kelso et al. (1985)--are explained and tested using a body of X-ray microbeam tracings of articulatory movement in English stress pairs. The first study is a replication of Harris et al. Correlations between jaw movement periods and some variables indicative of the relative timing of lip and tongue-blade movement...

  10. lnterarticulator Timing and Single-Articulator Velocity-Displacement in English Stress Pairs

    deJong, Kenneth
    Models of speech production utilize mentalist accounts of speech phenomena to varying degrees. Especially noted in this paper are accounts of the timing of speech which have sought to eliminate altogether the temporal dimension from mental control. Two major parts of the theory--that in Harris et al. (1986), and that in Kelso et al. (1985)--are explained and tested using a body of X-ray microbeam tracings of articulatory movement in English stress pairs. The first study is a replication of Harris et al. Correlations between jaw movement periods and some variables indicative of the relative timing of lip and tongue-blade movement...

  11. Illicit Acceptability in picture NPs

    Cowart, Wayne
    Four experiments examine the interaction between extraction and specificity in picture NPs. The results indicate that the acceptability judgements of naive speakers show highly robust patterns that do not conform well to widely held assumptions about the relative acceptability of several theoretically important kinds of sentence. There is also evidence that the difference between argument and non-argument extractions has a marked impact on acceptability (though no such acceptability difference has figured in linguistic theory). Further, the paper argues that there are circumstances in which ungrammatical sentences may be rendered acceptable via the intrusion of extragrammatical mechanisms in comprehension. Thus, the...

  12. Illicit Acceptability in picture NPs

    Cowart, Wayne
    Four experiments examine the interaction between extraction and specificity in picture NPs. The results indicate that the acceptability judgements of naive speakers show highly robust patterns that do not conform well to widely held assumptions about the relative acceptability of several theoretically important kinds of sentence. There is also evidence that the difference between argument and non-argument extractions has a marked impact on acceptability (though no such acceptability difference has figured in linguistic theory). Further, the paper argues that there are circumstances in which ungrammatical sentences may be rendered acceptable via the intrusion of extragrammatical mechanisms in comprehension. Thus, the...

  13. 'Kriptenstein's' Skeptical Paradox and Chomsky's Reply

    Scholz, Barbara
    Chomsky's KNOWLEDGE OF LANGUAGE addresses certain conceptual questions about the foundations of generative linguistics that center on a 'skeptical paradox' that Kripke attributes to Wittgenstein. Chomsky's discussion offers an extended defense of his psychological conception of grammar against this challenge. This essay argues that Chomsky's response to the skeptical paradox is inadequate, but instructively so. The inadequacies of Chomsky's reply surface as a destructive dilemma for the psycholinguist conceptually committed to the generative paradigm in such a way as to reveal a conceptual incoherence in that paradigm. Specifically, the essay exhibits the dilemma as it arises for the performance theory...

  14. 'Kriptenstein's' Skeptical Paradox and Chomsky's Reply

    Scholz, Barbara
    Chomsky's KNOWLEDGE OF LANGUAGE addresses certain conceptual questions about the foundations of generative linguistics that center on a 'skeptical paradox' that Kripke attributes to Wittgenstein. Chomsky's discussion offers an extended defense of his psychological conception of grammar against this challenge. This essay argues that Chomsky's response to the skeptical paradox is inadequate, but instructively so. The inadequacies of Chomsky's reply surface as a destructive dilemma for the psycholinguist conceptually committed to the generative paradigm in such a way as to reveal a conceptual incoherence in that paradigm. Specifically, the essay exhibits the dilemma as it arises for the performance theory...

  15. A Visual Half Field Study of Sentence Processing

    Beale, James; Cowart, Wayne
    This study attempts to exploit visual half field presentations of words in sentence contexts as an aid in the analysis of a cognitive function related to anaphoric processing. The function in question assimilates several kinds of information to resolve certain syntactic ambiguities. The experiments address the question whether all aspects of this linguistically complex function are supported by the language dominant left hemisphere. The evidence suggests that the anaphoric function is bihemispheric, i.e., that subfunctions supported by both hemispheres play a crucial role.

  16. A Visual Half Field Study of Sentence Processing

    Beale, James; Cowart, Wayne
    This study attempts to exploit visual half field presentations of words in sentence contexts as an aid in the analysis of a cognitive function related to anaphoric processing. The function in question assimilates several kinds of information to resolve certain syntactic ambiguities. The experiments address the question whether all aspects of this linguistically complex function are supported by the language dominant left hemisphere. The evidence suggests that the anaphoric function is bihemispheric, i.e., that subfunctions supported by both hemispheres play a crucial role.

  17. Asymmetries in Naming Accuracy and in Event-related Potentials for Laterally Presented Words of Variable Morphological Complexity

    McAdams, Brian
    Recent studies indicate that hemispheric asymmetries in lexical access exist, with the left hemisphere being superior in processing morphologically complex words. The present study looks for asymmetries in naming accuracy and in topographically displayed event-related potentials to laterally presented words. Data were collected from six subjects while words were presented to both visual fields. Right visual field superiority in naming accuracy was demonstrated for suffixed forms as expected, indicating a potential left hemisphere advantage for morphological processing. Event-related potential data revealed stimulus-relevant positive parietal peaks around 320 msec.

  18. Asymmetries in Naming Accuracy and in Event-related Potentials for Laterally Presented Words of Variable Morphological Complexity

    McAdams, Brian
    Recent studies indicate that hemispheric asymmetries in lexical access exist, with the left hemisphere being superior in processing morphologically complex words. The present study looks for asymmetries in naming accuracy and in topographically displayed event-related potentials to laterally presented words. Data were collected from six subjects while words were presented to both visual fields. Right visual field superiority in naming accuracy was demonstrated for suffixed forms as expected, indicating a potential left hemisphere advantage for morphological processing. Event-related potential data revealed stimulus-relevant positive parietal peaks around 320 msec.

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